duke


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duke

 (do͞ok, dyo͞ok)
n.
1. A nobleman with the highest hereditary rank, especially a man of the highest grade of the peerage in Great Britain.
2. A sovereign prince who rules an independent duchy in some European countries.
3. Used as the title for such a nobleman.
4. dukes Slang The fists: Put up your dukes!
5. Botany A type of cherry intermediate between a sweet and a sour cherry.
intr.v. duked, duk·ing, dukes
To fight, especially with fists: duking it out.

[Middle English, from Old French duc, from Latin dux, duc-, leader, from dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 4, short for Duke of Yorks, rhyming slang for forks, fingers.]

duke

(djuːk)
n
1. a nobleman of high rank: in the British Isles standing above the other grades of the nobility
2. the prince or ruler of a small principality or duchy
[C12: from Old French duc, from Latin dux leader]

duke

(duk, dyuk)

n.
1. (in Continental Europe) the male ruler of a duchy; the sovereign of a small state.
2. a British nobleman holding the highest hereditary title outside the royal family, ranking immediately below a prince and above a marquis.
3. a nobleman of corresponding rank in certain other countries.
4. a cultivated hybrid of the sweet and sour cherry.
5. dukes, Slang. fists or hands.
Idioms:
duke it out, to fight, esp. with the fists; do battle.
[1100–50; Middle English duke, duc, late Old English duc < Old French duc, dus, dux < Medieval Latin dux hereditary ruler of a small state, Latin: leader, commander]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duke - a British peer of the highest rankduke - a British peer of the highest rank  
peer - a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage
2.duke - a nobleman (in various countries) of high rank
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Translations
hertog
دوق
vévodavelkovévoda
hertug
duko
herttua
herceg
hertogi
dux
hercogashercogohercogystė
hercogs
duce
vojvoda
vojvoda
dük

duke

[djuːk] Nduque m

duke

[ˈdjuːk] nduc m
the Duke of Edinburgh → le duc d'Édimbourg

duke

nHerzog m

duke

[djuːk] nduca m

duke

(djuːk) noun
a nobleman of the highest rank.
ducal (ˈdjuːkəl) adjective
ˈdukedom noun
the rank or territories of a duke.
References in classic literature ?
A portrait of this young lady, painted by a Venetian artist, and left by her father in England, is said to have fallen into the hands of the present Duke of Devonshire, and to be now preserved at Chatsworth; not on account of any associations with the original, but for its value as a picture, and the high character of beauty in the countenance.
What are the Duke of Dunder's hereditary towns and hamlets but Fast-Fish?
If you spoke of the duke, or the earl, or the bishop, how could anybody tell which one you meant?
The men created a couple of new ranks, thitherto unknown to the army regulations, and conferred them upon Cathy, with ceremonies suitable to a duke.
Presently another open carriage brought the Grand Duke of Baden, a stately man in uniform, who wore the handsome brass-mounted, steel-spiked helmet of the army on his head.
My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of Bridgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last century, to breathe the pure air of free- dom; married here, and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same time.
A circumstance which greatly tended to enhance the tyranny of the nobility, and the sufferings of the inferior classes, arose from the consequences of the Conquest by Duke William of Normandy.
I was not new to violent death--I have served his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland, and got a wound myself at Fontenoy-- but I know my pulse went dot and carry one.
I should not have dwelt so long upon this particular, if it had not been a point wherein the reputation of a great lady is so nearly concerned, to say nothing of my own; though I then had the honour to be a NARDAC, which the treasurer himself is not; for all the world knows, that he is only a GLUMGLUM, a title inferior by one degree, as that of a marquis is to a duke in England; yet I allow he preceded me in right of his post.
He threw over him his scarlet mantle, put on his head a montera of green velvet trimmed with silver edging, flung across his shoulder the baldric with his good trenchant sword, took up a large rosary that he always carried with him, and with great solemnity and precision of gait proceeded to the antechamber where the duke and duchess were already dressed and waiting for him.
Bonacieux and the duke entered the Louvre without difficulty.
wrote, in a hand as small as possible, another note on the margin of his Horace, and then looking at the duke with the air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own, while he is only commenting upon the idea of another, said, --