dukes


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duke

 (do͞ok, dyo͞ok)
n.
1. A nobleman with the highest hereditary rank, especially a man of the highest grade of the peerage in Great Britain.
2. A sovereign prince who rules an independent duchy in some European countries.
3. Used as the title for such a nobleman.
4. dukes Slang The fists: Put up your dukes!
5. Botany A type of cherry intermediate between a sweet and a sour cherry.
intr.v. duked, duk·ing, dukes
To fight, especially with fists: duking it out.

[Middle English, from Old French duc, from Latin dux, duc-, leader, from dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 4, short for Duke of Yorks, rhyming slang for forks, fingers.]

dukes

(djuːks)
pl n
slang the fists (esp in the phrase put your dukes up)
[C19: from Duke of Yorks rhyming slang for forks (fingers)]
Translations

dukes

[djuːks] NPLpuños mpl

dukes

pl (dated sl, = fists) → Fäuste pl; put up your dukeszeig mal deine Fäuste (inf)
References in classic literature ?
Some, with tickets in their hats (long travellers these, before whom lay a hundred miles of railroad), had plunged into the English scenery and adventures of pamphlet novels, and were keeping company with dukes and earls.
In the Middle Ages, a couple of young dukes, brothers, took opposite sides in one of the wars, the one fighting for the Emperor, the other against him.
I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lordship, and so on, 'stead of mister; and Jim's eyes bugged out, and he was interested.
In most countries they're awful high up in the nobility -- dukes and such.
But as to counts, marquises, dukes, earls, and the like, I was not so scrupulous.
and who more gallant and courteous than Ruggiero, from whom the dukes of Ferrara of the present day are descended, according to Turpin in his 'Cosmography.
He despised small game and insignificant personalities, whether in the shape of dukes or bagmen, letting them go by like sea-weed; but show him a refined or powerful face, let him hear a plangent or a penetrating voice, fish for him with a living look in some one's eye, a passionate gesture, a meaning and ambiguous smile, and his mind was instantaneously awakened.
These four men were not princes, neither were they dukes, neither were they men in power; they were not even rich.
faubourg = neighborhood ; Rosny = Chateau of Rosny, country estate of the Dukes of Berry at Rosny-sur-Seine; Madame = title of Princess Marie Therese Charlotte, wife of the Dauphin Louis Antoine, heir to Charles X}
Oo're big enough to be two Dukes," said the little creature.
Loret, are as great as dukes and peers, as great as princes, greater than myself.
Then she introduced successively three dukes, three counts, and a baron.