dump bin

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dump bin

n
1. (Marketing) a free-standing unit in a bookshop in which the books of a particular publisher are displayed
2. (Marketing) a container in a shop in which goods are heaped, often in a disorderly fashion
References in periodicals archive ?
We sell a variety of mobile displayers that create interest and sales by helping turn passive shoppers into active buyers, including tables, trolleys, carts, baskets, merchandisers, dump bins, stands, merchandising bunks, and even orchard bins with fencing and casters," says Cathy McCosham, merchandise manager for Hubert Co.
A forklift driver will dump bins into a hopper located on a platform above the destemmer and press.
Acquisition of the residual waste (household waste from the kerbside collection and coarsely shredded bulky waste) at the transfer station dump bins mountain;
We have magnetic poles, dump bins, wing panels and other displays that can fit into any retailer, large or small.
It is truly a single-serve-size item, and we have many in-store merchandising vehicles to take advantage of impulse purchases, including dump bins and wing panels," notes Smith.
The 60 books on show in the Designer Bookbinders exhibition are all unique and definitely not destined for the charity shop dump bins.
Sure, it was criticised for its garish point of sale, its sometimes cornymarketing and its dump bins in the middle of the aisles, but under the management of Keith Edwards, it was a six-day-a-week business.
com produce and supply plain or printed display boards, pavement boards, literature stands, partition boards, flipchart easels, dump bins and more.
and offers customers a wide range of unit types: from pallet displays to shelf, hook and cell units, and from dump bins to leaflet holders.
And that's not counting all of the rounders, waterfalls and dump bins in the store.
The initial offering was a success, so Kumar and her team decided to roll out the program, merchandising the products in wire dump bins at the front of the stores.
As a way of improving the security of off-site destruction, Tingle notes that newer truck designs allow a collection vehicle to automatically dump bins into truck compartments without any human contact before they are similarly automatically placed on the shredding conveyor at the plant.