duopoly

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du·op·o·ly

 (do͞o-ŏp′ə-lē, dyo͞o-)
n. pl. du·op·o·lies
An economic or political condition in which power is concentrated in two persons or groups.

duopoly

(djʊˈɒpəlɪ)
n, pl -lies
(Commerce) a situation in which control of a commodity or service in a particular market is vested in just two producers or suppliers
duopolistic adj

du•op•o•ly

(duˈɒp ə li, dyu-)

n., pl. -lies.
a market situation in which prices and other factors are controlled by only two sellers.
[1915–20; duo- + (mono) poly]

duopoly

the market condition that exists when there are only two sellers. — duopolist, n.duopolistic, adj.
See also: Trade
Translations
duopole

duopoly

[djʊˈɒpəlɪ] Nduopolio m
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References in periodicals archive ?
These agreements create duopolies, which are akin to monopolies," Joyce said.
Nexstar's CEO, Perry Sook, commented that the purchase represented his company's first step in Grand Junction and Panama City and diversified its portfolio, creating additional duopolies or virtual duopolies.
We have identified various duopolies and the effectiveness of rivalry in them.
In line with the discussion of the (FMS, FMS) equilibrium, we now proceed in comparing the private and mixed duopolies in terms of the critical values for the difference in fixed costs as well as characterizing the (DE, DE) equilibrium.
The Children Now study showed that the largest decrease in programming for children occurred at stations that are part of duopolies, in which one company owns two stations in the same market.
This applies both to ambitious newspaper groups like Gannett, Tribune and even the New York Times, which may now look to build regional multimedia mini empires, and to hungry congloms like Viacom and Disney, eager to solidify duopolies in top markets.
The Viacom-CBS mergers results in television duopolies in six markets.
The major purpose of this article is to examine the differences in service and prices between hub duopolies (hubs dominated by two carriers) and hub monopolie (hubs dominated by a single carrier) in an effort to determine what a city coul gain from the addition of a second carrier to a dominated hub.
If duopolies catch on in Slade's market with the resulting stations using black formats, they stand to offer advertisers an irresistible package: cheap ads and a new crop of black listeners.
This includes five duopolies in the top 10 markets, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas and Washington D.
s TV landscape has seen major upheaval ever since the Federal Communications Commission approved duopolies in 1999.