durably


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du·ra·ble

 (do͝or′ə-bəl, dyo͝or′-)
adj.
1.
a. Capable of withstanding wear and tear or decay: a durable fabric.
b. Made to withstand repeated use over a relatively long period, usually several years or more: durable goods such as washing machines and dryers.
2. Able to perform or compete over a long period, as by avoiding or overcoming injuries: a durable fullback.
3. Lasting; stable: a durable friendship.
n.
A good or product made to withstand repeated use over a relatively long period, usually several years or more: tracked the orders for automobiles and other durables.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dūrābilis, from dūrāre, to last; see deuə- in Indo-European roots.]

du′ra·bil′i·ty, du′ra·ble·ness n.
du′ra·bly adv.
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
These findings highlight the concerning long-term health trajectory for those with severe pediatric obesity and suggest that bariatric surgery can meaningfully and durably improve long-term outcomes in teens with this disease.
The Federal Reserve is clearly in no hurry to raise interest rates and durably perkier inflation may well continue to look a distant prospect until we see US wages rise.
From a traceable and controlled supply chain in Burkina Faso, Nerenyl is a biomimetic active ingredient developed by Silab Research that is rich in nere seed biosaccharides and capable of strengthening the skin barrier and durably moisturizing the skin.
Quality optics like the Nightforce are constructed more durably, and the higher-quality glass buys you every last minute of legal shooting time.
It brightens dull blonde hair and protects it durably.
Progress in strengthening the financial system, lightening the administrative burden for taxpayers, placing the electricity company's finances on a sustainable footing, and strengthening governance are critical to durably raising growth and employment prospects.
And it goes without saying that edges must be durably finished, capable of withstanding all wear and tear.
Reuters published the letter that explains quite clearly the position of Syriza: "The new government is committed to a broader and deeper reform process aimed at durably improving growth and employment prospects, achieving debt sustainability and financial stability, enhancing social fairness and mitigating the significant social cost of the ongoing crisis.
On the behalf of his country, he called on all the parties to fully and durably shoulder their responsibilities to progress on this demanding path towards peace.
The Greek authorities have expressed their commitment to a broader and stronger reform process aimed at durably improving growth prospects.
The waking infant brain quickly forgets newly-learnt names, but during sleep, words are more durably linked to objects and imprinted," said Angela Friederici, director at Max Planck Institute.