duress


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du·ress

 (do͝o-rĕs′, dyo͝o-)
n.
1.
a. Compulsion by threat or violence; coercion: confessed under duress.
b. Constraint or difficulty caused by misfortune: "children who needed only temporary care because their parents were ill, out of work, or under some other form of duress" (Stephan O'Connor).
2. Law
a. A fraud achieved through the use of a threat or compulsion: She had a cause of action for duress. His claim was based on duress.
b. A criminal defense for an act undertaken under threat of serious bodily harm: His defense was duress.
3. Forcible confinement.

[Middle English duresse, harshness, compulsion, from Old French durece, hardness, from Latin dūritia, from dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

duress

(djʊˈrɛs; djʊə-)
n
1. compulsion by use of force or threat; constraint; coercion (often in the phrase under duress)
2. (Law) law the illegal exercise of coercion
3. confinement; imprisonment
[C14: from Old French duresse, from Latin dūritia hardness, from dūrus hard]

du•ress

(dʊˈrɛs, dyʊ-, ˈdʊər ɪs, ˈdyʊər-)

n.
1. compulsion by threat or force.
2. constraint or coercion of a degree sufficient to void any legal agreement entered into or any act performed under its influence.
3. forcible restraint, esp. imprisonment.
[1275–1325; Middle English duresse < Middle French duresse, -esce, -ece < Latin dūritia hardness, harshness, oppression]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duress - compulsory force or threat; "confessed under duress"
force - a powerful effect or influence; "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"

duress

noun
1. pressure, threat, constraint, compulsion, coercion Her confession had been made under duress.

duress

noun
Power used to overcome resistance:
Translations
اکراه

duress

[djʊəˈres] N under duressbajo presión

duress

[djʊˈrɛs djʊəˈrɛs] n
under duress → sous la contrainte

duress

nZwang m; he signed the form under duresser hat die Unterschrift unter Zwang geleistet

duress

[djʊˈrɛs] n under duresssotto costrizione, con la coercizione

duress

n. coerción; coacción,
under ___bajo ___.
References in classic literature ?
The crowd without gave way, and several warriors entered the place, bringing with them the hapless conjurer, who had been left so long by the scout in duress.
The young men of the Clover Leaf Club pinned not their faith to the graces of person as much as they did to its prowess, its achievements in hand-to-hand conflicts, and its preservation from the legal duress that constantly menaced it.
Mike Tholen, economics director at industry body Oil and Gas UK, said "inevitably there will be further job losses" as firms operating in the UK continental shelf are under "such big duress from the fall in oil prices".
Request for Proposal (Competitive/Sealed): Rfp duress alarm system for municipal court
The Public Prosecution charged them with torturing a detainee into confessing under duress as stipulated in the provisions of the Penal Law.
Because of all of these factors, it was determined that an enterprise-wide mobile duress system from Inovonics was the ideal solution.
2) The majority construed the FAA to allow for the invalidation of arbitration clauses "by 'generally applicable contract defenses, such as fraud, duress, or unconscionability,' but not by defenses that apply only to arbitration or that derive their meaning from the fact that an agreement to arbitrate is at issue.
Under duress, Adele and her son take Frank into their home.
Their lawyer Seham Sulaibeekh claimed they only confessed under duress at the Public Prosecution.
Safety improved by threat assessment and faster response times when duress events are matched with video verification
Summary: The head of the Orthodox Church Thursday distanced himself from controversial comments by recently freed nuns held by Nusra Front militants, saying the remarks were made under duress.
For UK law students, this study guide outlines the main ideas of contract law, including its origins and functions and freedom of contract; the formation of a contract, including agreement, consideration, intention, and other factors; third party rights and privity; the terms and exclusion clauses; misrepresentation, mistake, duress, economic duress, undue influence, and illegality; discharge of a contract; and remedies.