dusky


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dusk·y

 (dŭs′kē)
adj. dusk·i·er, dusk·i·est
1. Having low diffused light; dim or shadowy.
2. Rather dark in color: dusky blue. See Synonyms at dark.

dusk′i·ly adv.
dusk′i·ness n.

dusky

(ˈdʌskɪ)
adj, duskier or duskiest
1. dark in colour; swarthy or dark-skinned
2. dim
ˈduskily adv
ˈduskiness n

dusk•y

(ˈdʌs ki)

adj. dusk•i•er, dusk•i•est.
1. somewhat dark; dimly lit; shadowy.
2. having dark skin.
3. of a dark color.
4. gloomy; sad.
[1550–60; dusk2 + -y1]
dusk′i•ly, adv.
dusk′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dusky - lighted by or as if by twilightdusky - lighted by or as if by twilight; "The dusky night rides down the sky/And ushers in the morn"-Henry Fielding; "the twilight glow of the sky"; "a boat on a twilit river"
dark - devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black; "sitting in a dark corner"; "a dark day"; "dark shadows"; "dark as the inside of a black cat"
2.dusky - naturally having skin of a dark color; "a dark-skinned beauty"; "gold earrings gleamed against her dusky cheeks"; "a smile on his swarthy face"; "`swart' is archaic"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
brunet, brunette - marked by dark or relatively dark pigmentation of hair or skin or eyes; "a brunette beauty"

dusky

adjective
1. dim, twilight, shady, shadowy, gloomy, murky, cloudy, overcast, crepuscular, darkish, twilit, tenebrous, caliginous (archaic) He was walking down the road one dusky evening.
2. dark, swarthy, dark-complexioned I could see dusky girls with flowers about their necks.

dusky

adjective
1. Deficient in brightness:
2. Somewhat black:
3. Of a complexion tending toward brown or black:
Translations
قاتِم اللوْن
temný
dystermørkmørkladen
myrkur; dökkleitur; drungalegur
koyucaloş

dusky

[ˈdʌskɪ] ADJ [pink, blue] → oscuro; [complexion] → moreno

dusky

[ˈdʌski] adj [evening] → sombre
dusky pink → vieux rose

dusky

adj (+er) (liter) room, evening, skin, colourdunkel; persondunkelhäutig; lightschwach; the light in the room was duskyes war dämmerig im Zimmer; dusky pinkaltrosa

dusky

[ˈdʌskɪ] adj (complexion, room, light) → scuro/a
dusky pink → rosa antico inv

dusk

(dask) noun
(the time of) partial darkness after the sun sets; twilight.
ˈdusky adjective
dark-coloured.
ˈduskiness noun
References in classic literature ?
Gnarled olive trees covered the hills with their dusky foliage, fruit hung golden in the orchard, and great scarlet anemones fringed the roadside, while beyond green slopes and craggy heights, the Maritime Alps rose sharp and white against the blue Italian sky.
Tall and with dusky cheeks and hair that fell in a mass from her shoul- ders, a figure should come striding down the stair- way before the startled loungers in the hotel office.
They paddled on up the river, the dusky Indians now and then breaking out into a chant that seemed to give their muscles new energy.
Though we had come from such different parts of the world, in both of us there was some dusky superstition that those shining groups have their influence upon what is and what is not to be.
All the mystery and witchery of the night seemed to have gathered there amid the perfumes and the dusky and tortuous outlines of flowers and foliage.
The sun had already disappeared, and the woods, suddenly deprived of his light*, were assuming a dusky hue, which keenly reminded him that the hour the savage usually chose for his most barbarous and remorseless acts of vengeance or hostility, was speedily drawing near.
Forth she steps into the dusky, time-darkened passage; a tall figure, clad in black silk, with a long and shrunken waist, feeling her way towards the stairs like a near-sighted person, as in truth she is.
The figure of that first ancestor, invested by family tradition with a dim and dusky grandeur, was present to my boyish imagination as far back as I can remember.
His only resource on such occasions, either to drown thought or drive away evil spirits, was to sing psalm tunes and the good people of Sleepy Hollow, as they sat by their doors of an evening, were often filled with awe at hearing his nasal melody, "in linked sweetness long drawn out," floating from the distant hill, or along the dusky road.
Crossing this dusky entry, and on through yon low-arched way --cut through what in old times must have been a great central chimney with fire-places all round --you enter the public room.
The woman looked calm, as the boat went on; and a beautiful soft summer breeze passed like a compassionate spirit over her head,--the gentle breeze, that never inquires whether the brow is dusky or fair that it fans.
The Spaniards have a good term to express this wild and dusky knowledge--Gramatica parda--tawny grammar, a kind of mother-wit derived from that same leopard to which I have referred.