dusty

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dust·y

 (dŭs′tē)
adj. dust·i·er, dust·i·est
1. Covered or filled with dust.
2. Consisting of or resembling dust; powdery.
3. Tinged with gray.
4. Timeworn; stale: the dusty precepts of a bygone era.

dust′i·ly adv.
dust′i·ness n.

dusty

(ˈdʌstɪ)
adj, dustier or dustiest
1. covered with or involving dust
2. like dust in appearance or colour
3. (Colours) (of a colour) tinged with grey; pale: dusty pink.
4. a dusty answer an unhelpful or bad-tempered reply
5. not so dusty informal not too bad; fairly well: often in response to the greeting how are you?
ˈdustily adv
ˈdustiness n

dust•y

(ˈdʌs ti)

adj. dust•i•er, dust•i•est.
1. filled, covered, or clouded with or as if with dust.
2. powdery.
3. of the color of dust; of grayish cast.
[1175–1225]
dust′i•ly, adv.
dust′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dusty - covered with a layer of dust; "a dusty pile of books"
covered - overlaid or spread or topped with or enclosed within something; sometimes used as a combining form; "women with covered faces"; "covered wagons"; "a covered balcony"
2.dusty - lacking originality or spontaneity; no longer new; "moth-eaten theories about race"; "stale news"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

dusty

adjective
1. dirty, grubby, unclean, unswept, undusted The books looked dusty and unused.
2. powdery, sandy, chalky, crumbly, granular, friable Inside the box was only a dusty substance.

dusty

adjective
Consisting of small particles:
Translations
مُغَبَّرمُغْبَر
zaprášený
støvet
pölyinen
prašnjav
porosporszerűszürke
rykugur
ほこりっぽい
먼지투성이의
zaprášený
prašen
dammig
ซึ่งปกคลุมไปด้วยฝุ่น
tozlutoz gibitoz içinde
đầy bụi

dusty

[ˈdʌstɪ] ADJ (dustier (compar) (dustiest (superl)))
1. (= covered in dust) [town, ground, track, atmosphere] → polvoriento; [furniture, book, car] → cubierto de polvo
to get dusty [table, book] → cubrirse de polvo; [room, house] → llenarse de polvo
2. (= greyish) → grisáceo
dusty blueazul m grisáceo
dusty pinkrosa m grisáceo, rosa m viejo
3. (Brit) a dusty answer or replyuna respuesta evasiva
"how are you?" - "not so dusty or not too dusty, thanks"-¿cómo estás? -no mal del todo, gracias

dusty

[ˈdʌsti] adj [furniture, room, road, car] → poussiéreux/euse

dusty

adj (+er)
(= full of dust, covered in dust)staubig; furniture, book, photographverstaubt
colourschmutzig; dusty reds and brownsschmutzige Rot- und Brauntöne; dusty bluegraublau; dusty pinkaltrosa
(inf) answerschroff
not too or so dusty (inf)gar nicht so übel (inf)

dusty

[ˈdʌstɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → polveroso/a
to get dusty → impolverarsi

dust

(dast) noun
1. fine grains of earth, sand etc. The furniture was covered in dust.
2. anything in the form of fine powder. gold-dust; sawdust.
verb
to free (furniture etc) from dust. She dusts (the house) once a week.
ˈduster noun
a cloth for removing dust.
ˈdusty adjective
a dusty floor.
ˈdustiness noun
dustbin (ˈdasbin) noun
(American ˈgarbage-can or ˈtrash-can) a container for household rubbish.
dust-jacket (ˈdasdʒӕkit) noun
the loose paper cover of a book.
dustman (ˈdasmən) noun
a person employed to remove household rubbish.
dustpan (ˈdaspӕn) noun
a type of flat container with a handle, used for holding dust swept from the floor.
ˈdust-up noun
a quarrel. There was a bit of a dust-up between the two men.
dust down
to remove the dust from with a brushing action. She picked herself up and dusted herself down.
throw dust in someone's eyes
to try to deceive someone.

dusty

مُغَبَّر zaprášený støvet staubig σκονισμένος polvoriento pölyinen poussiéreux prašnjav polveroso ほこりっぽい 먼지투성이의 stoffig støvet zakurzony empoeirado пыльный dammig ซึ่งปกคลุมไปด้วยฝุ่น tozlu đầy bụi 有灰尘的
References in classic literature ?
We had sealed up several packets; and were still going on dustily and quietly, when Mr.
It will just dustily join other highly endorsed conclaves like the Bogra-Nehru meet in 1953, the Sind-Ts agreement in 1960 to settle a water dispute which flowed sinuously into two major conflicts, the 1966 Tashkent declaration, which saw an Indian PM die at the conference, the famous 1972 Shimla summit designed to end bitterness and ran out of breath, the Delhi, Lahore and Agra summits that led into the next century marked a little earlier by General Zia's "cricketlomacy" in Jodhpur with the Gilani and Zardari tete a tetes with Manmohan bringing us to the present sans any progress.
They can spring sudden surprises with perfect comic timing, as when they deliver an unexpected tribute after heaping the following imprecations on Of Education, Milton's draconian plan for pedagogical reform: "Repressive, prescriptive, elitist, masculinist, militaristic, dustily pedantic, class-ridden, and affectionless, Milton's nightmarish model for English education would, of course, have been unendurable to anyone as instinctively oppositional as its designer" (181).