dwarfish


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dwarf

 (dwôrf)
n. pl. dwarfs or dwarves (dwôrvz)
1.
a. A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
b. An atypically small animal or plant.
2. A small creature resembling a human, often having magical powers, appearing in legends and fairy tales.
3. A dwarf star.
v. dwarfed, dwarf·ing, dwarfs
v.tr.
1. To check the natural growth or development of; stunt: "The oaks were dwarfed from lack of moisture" (John Steinbeck).
2. To cause to appear small by comparison: "Together these two big men dwarfed the tiny Broadway office" (Saul Bellow).
v.intr.
To become stunted or grow smaller.

[Middle English dwerf, from Old English dweorh.]

dwarf′ish adj.

dwarf•ish

(ˈdwɔr fɪʃ)

adj.
like a dwarf, esp. in being abnormally small; diminutive.
[1555–65]
dwarf′ish•ly, adv.
dwarf′ish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dwarfish - atypically small; "dwarf tree"; "dwarf star"
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"
References in classic literature ?
The large man was always home precisely at ten o'clock at night, at which hour he regularly condensed himself into the limits of a dwarfish French bedstead in the back parlour; and the infantine sports and gymnastic exercises of Master Bardell were exclusively confined to the neighbouring pavements and gutters.
But her dwarfish spouse still smoked his cigar and drank his rum without heeding her; and it was not until the sun had some time risen, and the activity and noise of city day were rife in the street, that he deigned to recognize her presence by any word or sign.
Hyde was pale and dwarfish, he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation, he had a displeasing smile, he had borne himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity and boldness, and he spoke with a husky, whispering and somewhat broken voice; all these were points against him, but not all of these together could explain the hitherto unknown disgust, loathing and fear with which Mr.
Hop-Frog, and a young girl very little less dwarfish than himself(although of exquisite proportions, and a marvellous dancer), had been forcibly carried off from their respective homes in adjoining provinces, and sent as presents to the king, by one of his ever-victorious generals.
In North-European mythology, a dwarfish imp inhabiting the
As far as the eye can reach stretches the great flat plain-land, all dusted over with patches of alkali, and intersected by clumps of the dwarfish chaparral bushes.
The banks low, the trees dwarfish, the marshes swarming with frogs, the wretched cabins few and far apart, their inmates hollow-cheeked and pale, the weather very hot, mosquitoes penetrating into every crack and crevice of the boat, mud and slime on everything: nothing pleasant in its aspect, but the harmless lightning which flickers every night upon the dark horizon.
inquired Scrooge: observant of its dwarfish stature.
This very dapper but dwarfish figure, with the spike of black beard carried insolently forward, the clever unrestful eyes, the neat but very nervous fingers, could be none other than the man just described to him: Isidore Smythe, who made dolls out of banana skins and match-boxes; Isidore Smythe, who made millions out of undrinking butlers and unflirting housemaids of metal.
The temple was gone, and the idols were gone--and in their place the figures of dark, dwarfish men lurked murderously among the trees, with bows in their hands, and arrows fitted to the string.
It was just large enough to be the water-course for a small stream which vanished at intervals under green tunnels of undergrowth, as if in a dwarfish forest.
The vegetation, as might be supposed, is scant, or at least dwarfish.