dike

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dike 1

also dyke  (dīk)
n.
1.
a. An embankment of earth and rock built to prevent floods.
b. Chiefly British A low wall, often of sod, dividing or enclosing lands.
2. A barrier blocking a passage, especially for protection.
3. A raised causeway.
4. A ditch; a channel.
5. Geology A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rock.
tr.v. diked, dik·ing, dikes also dyked or dyk·ing or dykes
1. To protect, enclose, or provide with a dike.
2. To drain with dikes or ditches.

[Middle English, from Old English dīc, trench; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots, and from Old Norse dīki, ditch.]

dik′er n.

dike 2

 (dīk)
n. Offensive Slang
Variant of dyke2.

dike

(daɪk)
n, vb
1. (Civil Engineering) a variant spelling of dyke1
2. (Geological Science) a variant spelling of dyke1

dike

(daɪk)
n
a variant spelling of dyke2

dike1

or dyke

(daɪk)

n., v. diked, dik•ing. n.
1. an embankment for controlling or holding back the waters of the sea or a river.
2. ditch.
3. a bank of earth formed of material being excavated.
5. an obstacle; barrier.
6.
a. a long, narrow, cross-cutting mass of igneous rock intruded into a fissure in older rock.
b. a similar mass of rock composed of other kinds of material, as sandstone.
v.t.
7. to furnish or drain with a dike.
8. to enclose, restrain, or protect by a dike.
[before 900; dik(e), Old English dīc < Old Norse dīki; akin to ditch]
dik′er, n.

dike2

(daɪk)

n.
dike′y, adj.

dike

(dīk)
A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjoining rock. It is often of a different composition than the rock it cuts across and can be useful in determining the age relationship between rocks.

dike


Past participle: diked
Gerund: diking

Imperative
dike
dike
Present
I dike
you dike
he/she/it dikes
we dike
you dike
they dike
Preterite
I diked
you diked
he/she/it diked
we diked
you diked
they diked
Present Continuous
I am diking
you are diking
he/she/it is diking
we are diking
you are diking
they are diking
Present Perfect
I have diked
you have diked
he/she/it has diked
we have diked
you have diked
they have diked
Past Continuous
I was diking
you were diking
he/she/it was diking
we were diking
you were diking
they were diking
Past Perfect
I had diked
you had diked
he/she/it had diked
we had diked
you had diked
they had diked
Future
I will dike
you will dike
he/she/it will dike
we will dike
you will dike
they will dike
Future Perfect
I will have diked
you will have diked
he/she/it will have diked
we will have diked
you will have diked
they will have diked
Future Continuous
I will be diking
you will be diking
he/she/it will be diking
we will be diking
you will be diking
they will be diking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diking
you have been diking
he/she/it has been diking
we have been diking
you have been diking
they have been diking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diking
you will have been diking
he/she/it will have been diking
we will have been diking
you will have been diking
they will have been diking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diking
you had been diking
he/she/it had been diking
we had been diking
you had been diking
they had been diking
Conditional
I would dike
you would dike
he/she/it would dike
we would dike
you would dike
they would dike
Past Conditional
I would have diked
you would have diked
he/she/it would have diked
we would have diked
you would have diked
they would have diked

dike


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A vertical sheet of igneous rock that has intruded across older rocks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dike - (slang) offensive term for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
gay woman, lesbian, tribade - a female homosexual
2.dike - a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
milldam - dam to make a millpond to provide power for a water mill
weir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flow
Verb1.dike - enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"
Translations
سَد، حاجِز
flóîgarîur, stíflugarîur
aizsprostsdambis

dyke,

dike

(daik) noun
an embankment built as a barrier against the sea etc.
References in classic literature ?
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.
The river to its topmost banks Swollen with death; the dykes of the Great Wall Brimming with blood.
He rushed across the plain like a winter torrent that has burst its barrier in full flood; no dykes, no walls of fruitful vineyards can embank it when it is swollen with rain from heaven, but in a moment it comes tearing onward, and lays many a field waste that many a strong man's hand has reclaimed--even so were the dense phalanxes of the Trojans driven in rout by the son of Tydeus, and many though they were, they dared not abide his onslaught.
If it were possible for literature to use the microscope of the Leuwenhoeks, the Malpighis, and the Raspails (an attempt once made by Hoffman, of Berlin), and if we could magnify and then picture the teredos navalis, in other words, those ship-worms which brought Holland within an inch of collapsing by honey-combing her dykes, we might have been able to give a more distinct idea of Messieurs Gigonnet, Baudoyer, Saillard, Gaudron, Falleix, Transon, Godard and company, borers and burrowers, who proved their undermining power in the thirtieth year of this century.
The shattered and baked rocks, traversed by innumerable dykes of greenstone, showed what commotions had formerly taken place.
He looked afraid of somebody overhearing my audacious-- almost sacrilegious hint--as if there had not been a mile and a half of lonely marshland and dykes between us and the nearest human habitation.
Those who wish to be safe had better go soon, for the dykes will be opened to-morrow, and who can fly when the whole country is under water?
If her uncle was turned out of house and home, and forced to lay down in a dyke, Mas'r Davy,' said Mr.
And the cardinal began to examine with the greatest attention the map of La Rochelle, which, as we have said, lay open on the desk, tracing with a pencil the line in which the famous dyke was to pass which, eighteen months later, shut up the port of the besieged city.
From what we can make out, Van Dyke must have been a churchman.
It was some time before he learned its name; and for all I know he might have expected to find wild beasts or wild men here, when, crawling in the dark over the sea-wall, he rolled down the other side into a dyke, where it was another miracle he didn't get drowned.
Opposite to the mansions, on the other side of the gravel crescent, was a bushy enclosure more like a steep hedge or dyke than a garden, and some way below that ran a strip of artificial water, a sort of canal, like the moat of that embowered fortress.