dynamic


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dy·nam·ic

 (dī-năm′ĭk)
adj. also dy·nam·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
1.
a. Of or relating to energy or to objects in motion.
b. Of or relating to the study of dynamics.
2. Characterized by continuous change, activity, or progress: a dynamic housing market.
3. Characterized by much activity and vigor, especially in bringing about change; energetic and forceful. See Synonyms at active.
4. Of or relating to variation of intensity, as in musical sound.
n.
1. An interactive system or process, especially one involving competing or conflicting forces: "The traditional nineteenth-century dynamic between the sexes had begun to erode" (Jean Zimmerman).
2. A force, especially political, social, or psychological: the main dynamic behind the revolution.

[French dynamique, from Greek dunamikos, powerful, from dunamis, power, from dunasthai, to be able; see deu- in Indo-European roots.]

dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

dynamic

(daɪˈnæmɪk)
adj
1. (General Physics) of or concerned with energy or forces that produce motion, as opposed to static
2. (General Physics) of or concerned with dynamics
3. Also: dynamical characterized by force of personality, ambition, energy, new ideas, etc
4. (Music, other) music of, relating to, or indicating dynamics: dynamic marks.
5. (Computer Science) computing (of a memory) needing its contents refreshed periodically. Compare static8
[C19: from French dynamique, from Greek dunamikos powerful, from dunamis power, from dunasthai to be able]
dyˈnamically adv

dy•nam•ic

(daɪˈnæm ɪk)

adj. Also, dy•nam′i•cal.
1. vigorously active or forceful; energetic.
2. characterized by or producing change or progression: a dynamic process.
3.
a. of or pertaining to force or power.
b. of or pertaining to force related to motion.
4. of or pertaining to the science of dynamics.
5. of or pertaining to the range of volume of musical sound.
6. (of a verb) nonstative.
n.
7. a force producing change.
[1810–20; < French dynamique < Greek dynamikós <dýnam(is) force, power]
dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.

dy·nam·ic

(dī-năm′ĭk)
1.
a. Relating to energy or to objects in motion. Compare static.
b. Relating to the study of dynamics.
2. Characterized by continuous change or activity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dynamic - an efficient incentive; "they hoped it would act as a spiritual dynamic on all churches"
incentive, inducement, motivator - a positive motivational influence
Adj.1.dynamic - characterized by action or forcefulness or force of personality; "a dynamic market"; "a dynamic speaker"; "the dynamic president of the firm"
energetic - possessing or exerting or displaying energy; "an energetic fund raiser for the college"; "an energetic group of hikers"; "it caused an energetic chemical reaction"
adynamic, undynamic - characterized by an absence of force or forcefulness
2.dynamic - of or relating to dynamics
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
3.dynamic - (used of verbs (e.g. `to run') and participial adjectives (e.g. `running' in `running water')) expressing action rather than a state of being
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)

dynamic

adjective energetic, spirited, powerful, active, vital, driving, electric, go-ahead, lively, magnetic, vigorous, animated, high-powered, forceful, go-getting (informal), tireless, indefatigable, high-octane (informal), zippy (informal), full of beans (informal) He seemed a dynamic and energetic leader.
sluggish, inactive, couldn't-care-less (informal), apathetic, listless, impassive, torpid, unenergetic, undynamic

dynamic

adjective
1. Possessing, exerting, or displaying energy:
Informal: peppy.
2. Full of or displaying force:
Translations
ديناميكي، حَرَكيديناميكيّقَوي ونَشيط
dynamický
dynamiskinitiativrigvirkelysten
dynaaminen
dinamičan
dinamikustetterõs
hreyfifræîilegur, sem snertir aflkraftmikill
活動的な
동적인
dinamikadinaminisdinamiškaidinamiškas
aktīvsdinamisksenerģisks
dynamický
dinamičen
dynamisk
เต็มไปด้วยพลังและความคิดสร้างสรรค์
năng động

dynamic

[daɪˈnæmɪk]
A. ADJ (Phys, fig) → dinámico
B. Ndinámica f

dynamic

[daɪˈnæmɪk]
adjdynamique
n [system, process, group] → dynamique f
the dynamics of sth → la dynamique de qch

dynamic

adj (also Phys) → dynamisch
nDynamik f

dynamic

[daɪˈnæmɪk] adjdinamico/a

dynamic

(daiˈnӕmik) adjective
1. concerned with force.
2. (of a person) forceful and very energetic.
dyˈnamically adverb
dyˈnamics noun singular
the science that deals with movement and force.

dynamic

ديناميكيّ dynamický dynamisk dynamisch δυναμικός dinámico dynaaminen dynamique dinamičan dinamico 活動的な 동적인 dynamisch dynamisk dynamiczny dinâmico динамичный dynamisk เต็มไปด้วยพลังและความคิดสร้างสรรค์ dinamik năng động 有活力的
References in classic literature ?
Until now, its dynamic force has remained under restraint, and has only been able to produce a small amount of power.
It was an innocent remark, and he understood it as such, but its effect on him was dynamic.
But he had found that humdrum world in a terribly dynamic condition, in which even badinage and lyrism had turned explosive; and the first day of this visit had become the most fatal epoch of his life.
he shouted fiercely at the end, his will penetrating the low intelligence of the black with dynamic force that made him jump to the task of brushing the loathsome swarms of flies away.
The tendency of the individual life is to be static rather than dynamic, and this tendency is made into a propulsion by civilization, where the obvious only is seen, and the unexpected rarely happens.
Aside from the fact that Dryden had never professed, probably, to be a radical Puritan, he certainly was not, like Milton and Bunyan, a heroic person, nor endowed with deep and dynamic convictions; on the other hand, he was very far from being base or dishonorable--no one can read his works attentively without being impressed by their spirit of straightforward manliness.
To accomplish the great desideratum of ærial navigation, it was very generally supposed that some exceedingly complicated application must be made of some unusually profound principle in dynamics.
The unconscious desire is not something actually existing, but merely a tendency to a certain behaviour; it has exactly the same status as a force in dynamics.
Is he not the celebrated author of The Dynamics of an Asteroid, a book which ascends to such rarefied heights of pure mathematics that it is said that there was no man in the scientific press capable of criticizing it?
Change is a critical dynamic that must be monitored and managed.
Dynamic disk is a technology that Microsoft developed to implement volume management and RAID.
Dynamic material property data on modern elastomers are more important than ever.