dynamics


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dy·nam·ics

 (dī-năm′ĭks)
n.
1.
a. (used with a sing. verb) The branch of mechanics that is concerned with the effects of forces on the motion of a body or system of bodies, especially of forces that do not originate within the system itself. Also called kinetics.
b. (used with a pl. verb) The forces and motions that characterize a system: The dynamics of ocean waves are complex.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The social, intellectual, or moral forces that produce activity and change in a given sphere: The dynamics of international trade have influenced our business decisions on this matter.
3. (used with a pl. verb) Variation in force or intensity, especially in musical sound.
4. (used with a sing. verb) Psychodynamics.

dynamics

(daɪˈnæmɪks)
n
1. (General Physics) (functioning as singular) the branch of mechanics concerned with the forces that change or produce the motions of bodies. Compare statics, kinematics
2. (General Physics) (functioning as singular) the branch of mechanics that includes statics and kinetics. See statics, kinetics
3. (General Physics) (functioning as singular) the branch of any science concerned with forces
4. those forces that produce change in any field or system
5. (Music, other) music
a. the various degrees of loudness called for in performance
b. Also called: dynamic marks or dynamic markings directions and symbols used to indicate degrees of loudness

dy•nam•ics

(daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n.
1. (used with a sing. v.) the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion and equilibrium of systems under the action of forces, usu. from outside the system.
2. (used with a pl. v.) the motivating or driving forces in any field or system.
3. (used with a pl. v.) the pattern or history of growth, change, and development in any field.
4. (used with a pl. v.) variation and gradation in the volume of musical sound.
5. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) psychodynamics.
[1780–90]

dy·nam·ics

(dī-năm′ĭks)
The branch of physics that deals with the effects of forces on the motions of bodies. Also called kinetics. Compare kinematics.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dynamics - the branch of mechanics concerned with the forces that cause motions of bodiesdynamics - the branch of mechanics concerned with the forces that cause motions of bodies
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
ballistics - the science of flight dynamics
Translations
عِلْمُ القُوى المُتَحَرِّكَه
dynamika
dynamik
dinamikaerõtan
hreyfifræîi, hreyfiaflfræîi
dynamika
dinamik bilgisi

dynamics

[daɪˈnæmɪks] NSINGdinámica f

dynamics

[daɪˈnæmɪks] n (= science) → dynamique f

dynamics

n sing or plDynamik f

dynamics

[daɪˈnæmɪks] nsgdinamica

dynamic

(daiˈnӕmik) adjective
1. concerned with force.
2. (of a person) forceful and very energetic.
dyˈnamically adverb
dyˈnamics noun singular
the science that deals with movement and force.

dy·nam·ics

n. dinámica, estudio de órganos o partes del cuerpo en movimiento.
References in classic literature ?
To accomplish the great desideratum of ærial navigation, it was very generally supposed that some exceedingly complicated application must be made of some unusually profound principle in dynamics.
The unconscious desire is not something actually existing, but merely a tendency to a certain behaviour; it has exactly the same status as a force in dynamics.
Is he not the celebrated author of The Dynamics of an Asteroid, a book which ascends to such rarefied heights of pure mathematics that it is said that there was no man in the scientific press capable of criticizing it?
Until now, its dynamic force has remained under restraint, and has only been able to produce a small amount of power.
It was an innocent remark, and he understood it as such, but its effect on him was dynamic.
But he had found that humdrum world in a terribly dynamic condition, in which even badinage and lyrism had turned explosive; and the first day of this visit had become the most fatal epoch of his life.
he shouted fiercely at the end, his will penetrating the low intelligence of the black with dynamic force that made him jump to the task of brushing the loathsome swarms of flies away.
The tendency of the individual life is to be static rather than dynamic, and this tendency is made into a propulsion by civilization, where the obvious only is seen, and the unexpected rarely happens.
Aside from the fact that Dryden had never professed, probably, to be a radical Puritan, he certainly was not, like Milton and Bunyan, a heroic person, nor endowed with deep and dynamic convictions; on the other hand, he was very far from being base or dishonorable--no one can read his works attentively without being impressed by their spirit of straightforward manliness.
Tax dynamics are simply those changes that can affect a company's tax situation.
Century City-based Northrop Grumman said it would be risky for the Navy to give General Dynamics Corp.
General Dynamics Electronic Systems, a subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE:GD), has announced that it will provide its InfoWorkSpace on-line collaboration software and support for up to 5,000 defense and national intelligence users under a $2.

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