dynamite


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dy·na·mite

 (dī′nə-mīt′)
n.
1. Any of a class of powerful explosives composed of nitroglycerin or ammonium nitrate dispersed in an absorbent medium with a combustible dope, such as wood pulp, and an antacid, such as calcium carbonate, used in blasting and mining.
2. Slang
a. Something exceptionally exciting or wonderful.
b. Something exceptionally dangerous: These allegations are political dynamite.
tr.v. dy·na·mit·ed, dy·na·mit·ing, dy·na·mites
To blow up, shatter, or otherwise destroy with dynamite.
adj. Slang
Outstanding; superb: a dynamite performance; a dynamite outfit.

[Swedish dynamit, from Greek dunamis, power; see dynamic.]

dy′na·mit′er n.
Word History: The Nobel Prizes were established by the Swedish chemist and industrialist Alfred Nobel (1833-1896) with funds from his immense personal fortune, amassed in part through the manufacture of explosives and armaments. Nobel was the inventor of dynamite—he had discovered that the highly explosive chemical compound nitroglycerine could be made easier to transport and handle if it was mixed with an inert substance. To name his mixture, Nobel invented the word dynamite. Originally coined in Swedish in the form dynamit, the word was compounded from Greek dunamis, "power," and the Swedish suffix -it, which corresponds to the English suffix -ite used to form the names of rocks, minerals, commercial products, and other substances. Greek dunamis also gave us words such as dynamic and dynamo. Dunamis is related to the Greek verb dunasthai, "to be able," from which comes English dynasty, denoting a family or group that wields power over several generations.

dynamite

(ˈdaɪnəˌmaɪt)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an explosive consisting of nitroglycerine or ammonium nitrate mixed with kieselguhr, sawdust, or wood pulp
2. informal a spectacular or potentially dangerous person or thing
vb
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (tr) to mine or blow up with dynamite
[C19 (coined by Alfred Nobel): from dynamo- + -ite1]
ˈdynaˌmiter n

dy•na•mite

(ˈdaɪ nəˌmaɪt)

n., v. -mit•ed, -mit•ing,
adj. n.
1. a high explosive, orig. consisting of nitroglycerin mixed with an absorbent substance, now with ammonium nitrate usu. replacing the nitroglycerin.
2. any person or thing having a spectacular or potentially explosive effect.
v.t.
3. to blow up, shatter, or destroy with dynamite.
4. to mine or charge with dynamite.
adj.
5. Informal. wonderful or exciting: a dynamite idea.
[1867; < Swedish dynamit, introduced by A.B. Nobel, its inventor; see dyna-, -ite1]
dy′na•mit`er, n.
dy`na•mit′ic (-ˈmɪt ɪk) adj.
dy`na•mit′i•cal•ly, adv.

dy·na·mite

(dī′nə-mīt′)
A powerful explosive used in blasting and mining. It typically consists of nitroglycerin and a nitrate, combined with an absorbent material that makes it safer to handle.

dynamite


Past participle: dynamited
Gerund: dynamiting

Imperative
dynamite
dynamite
Present
I dynamite
you dynamite
he/she/it dynamites
we dynamite
you dynamite
they dynamite
Preterite
I dynamited
you dynamited
he/she/it dynamited
we dynamited
you dynamited
they dynamited
Present Continuous
I am dynamiting
you are dynamiting
he/she/it is dynamiting
we are dynamiting
you are dynamiting
they are dynamiting
Present Perfect
I have dynamited
you have dynamited
he/she/it has dynamited
we have dynamited
you have dynamited
they have dynamited
Past Continuous
I was dynamiting
you were dynamiting
he/she/it was dynamiting
we were dynamiting
you were dynamiting
they were dynamiting
Past Perfect
I had dynamited
you had dynamited
he/she/it had dynamited
we had dynamited
you had dynamited
they had dynamited
Future
I will dynamite
you will dynamite
he/she/it will dynamite
we will dynamite
you will dynamite
they will dynamite
Future Perfect
I will have dynamited
you will have dynamited
he/she/it will have dynamited
we will have dynamited
you will have dynamited
they will have dynamited
Future Continuous
I will be dynamiting
you will be dynamiting
he/she/it will be dynamiting
we will be dynamiting
you will be dynamiting
they will be dynamiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dynamiting
you have been dynamiting
he/she/it has been dynamiting
we have been dynamiting
you have been dynamiting
they have been dynamiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dynamiting
you will have been dynamiting
he/she/it will have been dynamiting
we will have been dynamiting
you will have been dynamiting
they will have been dynamiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dynamiting
you had been dynamiting
he/she/it had been dynamiting
we had been dynamiting
you had been dynamiting
they had been dynamiting
Conditional
I would dynamite
you would dynamite
he/she/it would dynamite
we would dynamite
you would dynamite
they would dynamite
Past Conditional
I would have dynamited
you would have dynamited
he/she/it would have dynamited
we would have dynamited
you would have dynamited
they would have dynamited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dynamite - an explosive containing nitrate sensitized with nitroglycerin absorbed on wood pulpdynamite - an explosive containing nitrate sensitized with nitroglycerin absorbed on wood pulp
explosive compound - a compound that is explosive
gelignite, gelly - a type of dynamite in which the nitroglycerin is absorbed in a base of wood pulp and sodium or potassium nitrate
glyceryl trinitrate, nitroglycerin, nitroglycerine, Nitrospan, Nitrostat, trinitroglycerin - a heavy yellow poisonous oily explosive liquid obtained by nitrating glycerol; used in making explosives and medically as a vasodilator (trade names Nitrospan and Nitrostat)
Verb1.dynamite - blow up with dynamite; "The rock was dynamited"
blow up, detonate, explode, set off - cause to burst with a violent release of energy; "We exploded the nuclear bomb"

dynamite

verb
To pull down or break up so that reconstruction is impossible:
Aerospace: destruct.
Translations
ديناميت، نَسّاف
dynamit
dynamit
dinamit
dÿnamít
ダイナマイト
dinamitas
dinamīts
dynamietdynamiteren
dynamit
dinamit

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəmaɪt]
A. N
1. (= explosive) → dinamita f
2. (fig) he's dynamite!¡es estupendo!
the story is dynamite (Press) → la noticia es una bomba or pura dinamita
B. VT [+ bridge etc] → dinamitar, volar con dinamita

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəmaɪt]
n (= explosive) → dynamite f
to be dynamite [revelation, statement] (= highly contentious) → être une bombe ; [person, film] (= very exciting) → être du tonnerre
vt (= blow up) → dynamiter, faire sauter à la dynamite

dynamite

n (lit)Dynamit nt; (fig)Zünd- or Sprengstoff m; she is dynamitesie ist eine Wucht (inf); that story is pure dynamitediese Geschichte ist der reinste Zündstoff
vt rocks, bridgesprengen

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəˌmaɪt]
1. n
a.dinamite f
b. (fig) (fam) he's dynamite!è una bomba!
the story is dynamite → è una storia esplosiva
2. vtfar saltare con la dinamite

dynamite

(ˈdainəmait) noun
a type of powerful explosive.
References in classic literature ?
Nestor has never quite forgiven me for that mistake about the dynamite box, and that wasn't my fault.
It may be that this girl had a fact in her somewhere, but I don't believe you could have sluiced it out with a hydraulic; nor got it with the earlier forms of blasting, even; it was a case for dynamite.
16 Cases Hams 25 Spring Mattresses 2 Barrels Flour 2 Hair ditto 22 Barrels Whiskey Bedding for same 1 Barrel Sugar 2 Mosquito-nets 1 Keg Lemons 29 Tents 2,000 Cigars Scientific Instruments 1 Barrel Pies 97 Ice-axes 1 Ton of Pemmican 5 Cases Dynamite 143 Pair Crutches 7 Cans Nitroglycerin 2 Barrels Arnica 22 40-foot Ladders 1 Bale of Lint 2 Miles of Rope 27 Kegs Paregoric 154 Umbrellas
And I couldn't bear to see our love worn away by the daily dropping of tears, not to speak of its being rent by the dynamite of daily quarrels.
We send him forth through our crowded cities, proclaiming that he is the source of all good and evil in the nation, and he, knowing that many people believe it, knowing that it is a lie, and that he is powerless to shorten the working day by one hour, raise wages one penny, or annul the smallest criminal sentence, however unjust it may seem to him; knowing that every miner in the kingdom can manufacture dynamite, and that revolvers are sold for seven and sixpence apiece; knowing that he is not bullet proof, and that every king in Europe has been shot at in the streets; he must smile and bow and maintain an expression of gracious enjoyment whilst the mayor and corporation inflict upon him the twaddling address he has heard a thousand times before.
In one place I suddenly found myself near the model of a tin-mine, and then by the merest accident I discovered, in an air-tight case, two dynamite cartridges
And instead of our rush- ing about blind, on the howl, or getting dynamite on the chance of busting them up, we've got to fix ourselves up according to the new state of affairs.
If you had had a 'Shilling Dreadful' in your hand," she proceeded, "something about Ghosts or Dynamite or Midnight Murder--one could understand it: those things aren't worth the shilling, unless they give one a Nightmare.
None the less he handled the "Constance" as if she might have been a load of dynamite, and when the crew rebuked him, they did it in whispers and dumb show.
Dynamite was milky and innocuous beside that report Of C25; and even an Oriental, with an Oriental's views of the value of time, could see that the sooner it was in the proper hands the better.
There appeared now to be a constant danger of marrying the American girl; it was something one had to reckon with, like the railway, the telegraph, the discovery of dynamite, the Chassepot rifle, the Socialistic spirit: it was one of the complications of modern life.
As the sand is being poured into the well-hole, quantities of dynamite can also be thrown in