dysentery


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dys·en·ter·y

 (dĭs′ən-tĕr′ē)
n.
Any of several inflammatory disorders of the intestines, especially the colon, characterized by abdominal pain, fever, and severe diarrhea often with blood and mucus in the stool, usually caused by infection with bacteria or parasitic protozoans.

[Middle English dissenterie, from Old French, from Latin dysenteria, from Greek dusenteriā : dus-, dys- + enteron, intestine; see en in Indo-European roots.]

dys′en·ter′ic adj.

dysentery

(ˈdɪsəntrɪ)
n
(Pathology) infection of the intestine with bacteria or amoebae, marked chiefly by severe diarrhoea with the passage of mucus and blood
[C14: via Latin from Greek dusenteria, from dusentera, literally: bad bowels, from dys- + enteron intestine]
dysenteric adj

dys•en•ter•y

(ˈdɪs ənˌtɛr i)

n.
any infectious disease of the large intestines marked by hemorrhagic diarrhea with mucus and often blood in the feces.
[1350–1400; Middle English dissenterie < Old French < Medieval Latin dysenteria < Greek <dysénter(a) bad bowels]
dys`en•ter′ic, adj.

dys·en·ter·y

(dĭs′ən-tĕr′ē)
A disease of the lower intestines characterized by severe diarrhea, usually caused by infection with bacteria or parasites.

dysentery

A bacterial or amoebic infection causing bloody diarrhea, transmitted by infected food or water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysentery - an infection of the intestines marked by severe diarrhea
infectious disease - a disease transmitted only by a specific kind of contact
amebic dysentery, amoebic dysentery - inflammation of the intestines caused by Endamoeba histolytica; usually acquired by ingesting food or water contaminated with feces; characterized by severe diarrhea
bacillary dysentery, shigellosis - an acute infection of the intestine by shigella bacteria; characterized by diarrhea and fever and abdominal pains
diarrhea, diarrhoea, looseness, looseness of the bowels - frequent and watery bowel movements; can be a symptom of infection or food poisoning or colitis or a gastrointestinal tumor
Translations
إلْتِهاب الأمْعاء الغَليظَه
úplavice
dysenteri
vérhas
blóîsótt, blóîkreppusótt, òarmabólga
dizenterija
dizentērija
dizanterikanlı basur

dysentery

[ˈdɪsntrɪ] Ndisentería f

dysentery

[ˈdɪsəntəri] ndysenterie f

dysentery

nDysenterie f, → Ruhr f

dysentery

[ˈdɪsɪntrɪ] ndissenteria

dysentery

(ˈdisəntri) noun
an infectious disease with severe diarrhoea.

dys·en·ter·y

n. disentería, condición inflamatoria del intestino grueso causada por bacilos o parásitos con síntomas de diarrea y dolor abdominal;
amebic ______ amebiana;
bacillar ______ bacilar.;
___ malignant___ maligna;
viral ______ viral.

dysentery

n disentería
References in classic literature ?
The pitch was bubbling in the seams; the nasty stench of the place turned me sick; if ever a man smelt fever and dysentery, it was in that abominable anchorage.
For that most dreaded of Solomon Island scourges, dysentery, had struck Berande plantation, and he was all alone to cope with it.
Meringe owes Somo four heads, three from the dysentery, an' another wan from a tree fallin' on him the last fortnight.
my dear friend, there is bravery in facing scurvy, dysentery, locusts, poisoned arrows, as my ancestor St.
Williams, in his interesting work, [2] says, that the first intercourse between natives and Europeans, "is invariably attended with the introduction of fever, dysentery, or some other disease, which carries off numbers of the people.
He was a regular little lamb--for ten days, at the end of which time the Yorkshire man was prostrated by a combined attack of dysentery and fever.
Bubonic plague and small-pox were raging, while dysentery and pneumonia were reducing the population, and the railroad was raging worst of all.
According to MedicaLook, amoebiasis is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, and it results in an intestinal ailment known as amoebic dysentery.
Many kinds of diseases including cholera, guinea worm disease, typhoid, and dysentery are frequent occurrences in our country.
Unhygienic water compounds issues for the slum dwellers, lead to dehydration, dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid, cholera and gastroenteritis.
According to health experts, flies contaminate the food and are strongly suspected of transmitting at least 65 diseases to humans, including typhoid fever, dysentery, cholera, poliomyelitis, yaws, anthrax, tularemia, leprosy and tuberculosis.
Conclusions: The focus in management of patients presenting with diarrhoea in the Emergency Department should be on rehydration and that only certain patients, such as those with fever or dysentery, or those with an impaired immune response should receive empiric antimicrobial therapy.