dysphemism


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dysphemism

(ˈdɪsfɪˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) substitution of a derogatory or offensive word or phrase for an innocuous one
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the word or phrase so substituted
[C19: dys- + euphemism]
ˌdyspheˈmistic adj

dys•phe•mism

(ˈdɪs fəˌmɪz əm)

n.
1. the substitution of a harsh, disparaging, or unpleasant expression for a more neutral one.
2. an expression so substituted.
[1880–85; dys- + (eu) phemism]
dys`phe•mis′tic, adj.

dysphemism

1. a deliberate substitution of a disagreeable, offensive, or disparaging word for an otherwise inoffensive term, as pig for policeman.
2. an instance of such substitution. Cf. euphemism.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysphemism - an offensive or disparaging expression that is substituted for an inoffensive one; "his favorite dysphemism was to ask for axle grease when he wanted butter"
jalopy, heap, bus - a car that is old and unreliable; "the fenders had fallen off that old bus"
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
old man - an informal term for your father
euphemism - an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Part one, "Metaphor, Euphemism and Dysphemism," is an explanation of the author's terminological and theoretical standpoint.
Considering that and bearing in mind that erotic stories are a common euphemistic and dysphemistic ground, it is the aim of this paper to explore euphemism, dysphemism and x-phemism in a corpus which consists of the three books of the mentioned trilogy so as to observe if their usage depends on sexes and how these phenomena merge with metaphorical or metonymical devices to avoid a possible loss of face or highlight a taboo.
Finally, light is shed on the ways in which discerning medieval literary critics anticipated significant modern sociolinguistic observations: the relations between euphemism, orthophemism, and dysphemism, in addition to the incessant process of euphemism degradation.
Even celebrity chefs have become critics, with perhaps the prime example being Jamie Oliver, who once poured ammonia on beef trimmings in order to illustrate--in, I might add, a rather erroneous way--the production of Finely Textured Lean Beef, which is commonly known under its dysphemism, "Pink Slime" ("Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution: Pink Slime," 2011).
For example, a tendency for dysphemism is found markedly at work in Daisy Miller, which signifies the replacement of an easygoing and gratifying expression for an insensitive one such as 'grave' for crucial, 'unprotected' for daring, 'uncultivated' for ingenuous, 'spindle shanks' for knees, 'vivacious' for attractive, and 'coquette' for bold and frank, etc.
A dysphemism is a pejorative rather than an ameliorative term.
Euphemism and Dysphemism, Language Used as Shield and Weapon.
20) Flamenco as an elected term for a musical and dance style may have been something between a euphemism and a dysphemism, a lightly coded, deflective term.
Career politicians use this dysphemism for a reason: You might vote for higher taxes to solve an ``affordable housing'' crisis, but you would never knowingly raise your own taxes so someone with a higher income can spend a smaller percentage of it on housing.
In this collection of papers from scholars working in these states and from those observing from elsewhere, contributors describe the deconstruction, evolution, and reconstruction of this significant region, including such subjects as the similarities between postcolonialism and postsovietism, postmodern horizons in Baltic culture, the transition of culture, the effects of change on literature, the history of nazi and soviet dysphemism, cultural mimicry, perceptions of the self, national allegories, pain, postcolonial subjectivity, and the encounter with Europe.
The AD--You diminish valid critique with dysphemism, rather than with intelligent argument.
The directness of AAVE gets expressed in "aggressiveness, candor, dysphemism, negative criticism, upbraiding, conflict, abuse, insult, and obscenity--all frequently deployed in the context of consciously manipulated interpersonal drama.