dysphonia


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dys·pho·ni·a

 (dĭs-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in speaking, usually evidenced by hoarseness.

[New Latin : dys- + Greek -phōniā, -phony.]

dys·phon′ic (-fŏn′ĭk) adj.

dysphonia

(dɪsˈfəʊnɪə)
n
(Pathology) any impairment in the ability to speak normally, as from spasm or strain of the vocal cords
[C18: New Latin, from Greek: harshness of sound, from dys- + -phōnia -phony]
dysphonic adj

dys•pho•ni•a

(dɪsˈfoʊ ni ə)

n.
any disturbance of normal vocal function.
[1700–10; < Greek dysphōnía roughness of sound =dys- dys- + phōn(ḗ) sound, voice + -ia -ia]
dys•phon′ic (-ˈfɒn ɪk) adj.

dysphonia

speech problems resulting from damage to or malformation of the speech organs.
See also: Speech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysphonia - speech disorder attributable to a disorder of phonation
defect of speech, speech defect, speech disorder - a disorder of oral speech
Translations

dys·pho·ni·a

n. disfonía, ronquera.
References in periodicals archive ?
WORK-up: There are multiple infectious causes of fever, sore throat, dysphonia, and stridor to consider before proceeding with diagnostic measures.
Spasmodic dysphonia (or laryngeal dystonia) is a voice disorder caused by involuntary movements of one or more muscles of the larynx or voice box.
Max McCormick, a consultant ear, nose and throat surgeon at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital found she was suffering from spasmodic dysphonia - difficulty in speaking because of a spasm in the vocal chords.
However, problems like spasmodic dysphonia, which produces a severely strained, strangled-sounding voice, and laryngectomy (surgical removal of the voice box), which requires patients to have a new source of sound for voice, are disruptive to all aspects of living (cf.
Spasmodic dysphonia involves the muscles of the throat that control speech.
Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, in which involuntary closing of the vocal cords interrupts the airstream and produces a strained, hoarse, choppy voice.
0%), and the percentage of patients with oropharyngeal/laryngeal adverse events (such as oral candidiasis, dysphonia and pharyngolaryngeal pain) was low and comparable for each of the treatment groups.
Strobovideolaryngoscopy revealed immobility of the left vocal fold with a jostle sign, muscle tension dysphonia, reflux laryngitis, vocal fold bowing with glottic insufficiency, and a left vocal fold pseudocyst--a "paresis podule" (1) (figure).
demonstrated that up to one third of patients with thyroid disease experienced dysphonia at the time of presentation.
Thanks to Good Samaritans who contributed to my surgery for spasmodic dysphonia, a speech disorder.
In our case the foreign body was thin and got impacted antero-posteriorly because of its large size and was asymptomatic (silent) and produced dysphonia because of restriction of movements of vocal cords.