dysprosium


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dys·pro·si·um

 (dĭs-prō′zē-əm, -zhē-əm)
n. Symbol Dy
A soft, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series occurring in the minerals monazite and bastnaesite, used in nuclear reactor control rods and in the manufacture of laser materials and compact discs. Atomic number 66; atomic weight 162.50; melting point 1,412°C; boiling point 2,567°C; specific gravity 8.551; valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[New Latin, from Greek dusprositos, difficult to approach (from its rarity in nature) : dus-, dys- + prositos, approachable (from prosienai, to approach : pros-, toward + ienai, i-, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots).]

dysprosium

(dɪsˈprəʊsɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a soft silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series: used in laser materials and as a neutron absorber in nuclear control rods. Symbol: Dy; atomic no: 66; atomic wt: 162.50; valency: 3; relative density: 8.551; melting pt: 1412°C; boiling pt: 2567°C
[C20: New Latin, from Greek dusprositos difficult to get near + -ium]

dys•pro•si•um

(dɪsˈproʊ si əm, -ʃi-)

n.
a rare-earth element that is highly reactive and paramagnetic and used to absorb neutrons in nuclear reactors. Symbol: Dy; at. wt.: 162.50; at. no.: 66.
[< French (1886)]

dys·pro·si·um

(dĭs-prō′zē-əm)
Symbol Dy A soft, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series. Because it has a high melting point and absorbs neutrons well, dysprosium is used to help control nuclear reactions. Atomic number 66. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysprosium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth groupdysprosium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; forms compounds that are highly magnetic
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Translations
dysprosium
dysprosium
düsproosium
dysprosium
dysprosium
disprozij
diszprózium
dysprósín
ジスプロシウム
dysprosium
disprozis
dysprosium
dysproz
disprosiu
dysprosium
disprozij
dysprosium
References in periodicals archive ?
When powerful neodymium magnets are used at high temperatures, such as for automotive applications, terbium and dysprosium are generally added to increase high-temperature coercivity.
Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the Dysprosium Market including its definition, applications and manufacturing technology.
Honda, Japan's third-largest automaker, said that its new motors used magnets developed by Daido Steel Co that do not contain dysprosium and terbium.
Finding a comparable substitute material is key to reducing manufacturing reliance on dysprosium as the current demand for it outpaces mining and recycling sources for it, according to the Ames Lab.
USPRwire, Wed Sep 25 2013] Rising demand for miniaturization coupled with advancement in technology that leads to the availability of better quality ferrite magnets and neo magnets with lesser dysprosium content, together, will drive the permanent magnets market to $18.
New motors, which instead of relying on rare earth metal like neodymium and dysprosium will use a cheaper iron compound, will be fitted into Jaguar Land Rover Evoques within the next two years.
New motors - which instead of relying on rare earth metal like neodymium and dysprosium will use a cheaper iron compound - will be fitted into Jaguar Land Rover Evoques within the next two years.
But by far the most prized deposits are those in southern China, which produce a high proportion of scarce REEs including gadolinium and dysprosium.
Hohensee, Leefer and Dmitry Budker, a UC Berkeley professor of physics, conducted the test using a new technique involving two isotopes of the element dysprosium.
Among those topics are physico-mechanical properties of sintered iron-silica sand nanoparticle composites, synthesizing and characterizing novel nano ceramic magnesium ferrite material doped with samarium and dysprosium for designing a microstrip patch antenna, and injecting carbon dioxide and pumping out saline formation water simultaneously to control pressure build-up while storing carbon in deep saline aquifers.
Wrongly claiming that erbium is used to store data in Apple iPads, for instance, or that dysprosium is used in the batteries of hybrid cars.