dystonic


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dys·to·ni·a

 (dĭs-tō′nē-ə)
n.
Abnormal tonicity of muscle, characterized by prolonged, repetitive muscle contractions that may cause twisting or jerking movements of the body or a body part.

dys·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

dystonic

(dɪsˈtəʊnɪk)
adj
(Pathology) med relating to or affected by dystonia
References in periodicals archive ?
Members of the natural support system typically arrive at the threshold of syntonic enabling only after they have passed though the dystonic phase and have given up in a healthy way.
Although there is no cure for dystonia, many dystonic conditions can be successfully managed with the right treatment.
Socially, life can improve to a certain extent, but overly high expectations can be detrimental, especially when dystonic symptom breakthroughs can occur at any time.
One study that reported similar neurological effects to those observed in humans with manganism involved the administration of high doses of Mn oxide subcutaneously in monkeys for 5 months (total of 8 g Mn), causing dystonic posture, hyperactivity with an unsteady gait, and an action tremor at the high exposure levels (47).
Several themes emerged from the list of concerns, including education concerns, self-exploration concerns, ego dystonic emotional concerns, family-of-origin concerns, present relationship concerns, as well as a number of other concerns that did not fall in any specific category.
A Welsh Assembly Government spokesman said: "HCW cannot comment on individual patients, but Deep Brain Stimulation is not currently commissioned by Health Commission Wales for Dystonic Tremor other than in exceptional circumstances.
While she does note continued loss of autonomy, control, family, and friends, and she even places the dystonic elements preceding the syntonic (e.
Acute dystonic reactions such as facial spasm, trismus and torticollis occur in 0.
We report a case of a dystonic reaction possibly triggered by propofol, which was managed successfully by turning the patient prone.
First, there is what I call dystonic or dysfunctional enabling.
A broad range of disorders is covered, including acute dystonic reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, startle syndromes, and tic emergencies.
A diagnosis of acute dystonic reaction due to phenothiazine was made, the patient responding quickly and completely to anticholinergic medication.