dytiscid

dytiscid

(dɪˈtɪsɪd; daɪ-)
n
(Animals) any carnivorous aquatic beetle of the family Dytiscidae, having large flattened back legs used for swimming
adj
(Zoology) of, relating to, or belonging to the Dytiscidae
[C19: from New Latin Dytiscus genus name, changed from Greek dutikos able to dive, from duein to dive]
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on distributional patterns of several other dytiscid genera and morphology, initially it was suspected that there were as many as four taxa.
The impact of other predators such as the Dragonfly nymphs, Dytiscid and Hydrophilid beetles were limited to large deep containers.
With additional collecting, this dytiscid may eventually be found outside of Arkansas in adjacent states (S.
Temporal curvatures (Table I) are influenced by the size (mass) and/or origin of the abductor and adductor muscles with both muscles having important roles in capture of and feeding on prey by dytiscid larvae.
Alternative prey influences efficacy of biocontrol agents, evident from the studies on cyclopoid copepod (26), dytiscid beetles (27,28), odonate larvae (29), larvae of the predatory mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens (30), and heteropteran bugs (31-33).
The diversity of dytiscid water beetles at Fort Campbell Military Reservation was analyzed.
Several aquatic insect predators, such as crustaceans (1), dytiscid beetles (2), notonectid bugs (3), odonate naiads (4) and the hemipteran bugs (5) were previously documented for their efficacy as mosquito control agents in laboratory as well as in the field conditions.
Habitats with temperatures comparable to this site were likely present in a warm Atlantic coastal enclave during the last glacial maximum (LGM), making it probable that the LGM dytiscid fauna of Georgia included R.
The regulation of the mosquito immatures by the natural predators are affected by the presence of alternative prey forms as has been noted in case of the dytiscid beetles5, cyclopoid copepods (6), odonate nymphs (7,8) and the mosquito fishes (9-12).
Changes in prey regimes exploited during larval dytiscid development should be reflected in the morphology of the cranium and cranial appendages, particularly the mandibles.
ovatus Leech, easily distinguished from other dytiscid larvae by the presence of pseudochelate modifications of tibiae and tarsi.