dytiscid

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dytiscid

(dɪˈtɪsɪd; daɪ-)
n
(Animals) any carnivorous aquatic beetle of the family Dytiscidae, having large flattened back legs used for swimming
adj
(Zoology) of, relating to, or belonging to the Dytiscidae
[C19: from New Latin Dytiscus genus name, changed from Greek dutikos able to dive, from duein to dive]
References in periodicals archive ?
However for dytiscids as reported for 31 July (Table 1), warm ambient temperatures may not directly influence their physiology because of their aquatic habitat.
The number of replicates for each types of predators were: gerrids (12 replicates); hydrometrids (16 replicates); veliids (12 replicates); notonectids (18 replicates); and dytiscids (20 replicates).
Three hundred and seven collections were made throughout Tennessee for a total of 11,023 specimens and 101 species of dytiscids.
Tate AW and Hershey AE: Selective feeding by larval dytiscids (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) and effects of fish predation on upper littoral zone macroinvertebrate communities of Arctic lakes.
The non-mosquitoes invertebrates found in the stream pools along Jaribuni River included Gerrids, Hydrometrids, Notonectids, Naucorids, Dytiscids, Libullids, Coenagrionids and tadpoles.
Significant changes in prey regimes during development of larval dytiscids should be reflected in the morphology of the cranium and/or its appendages.
These larvae have well-developed series of natatory sensilla characteristic of nektonic dytiscids with the distribution of the spiniform sensilla corresponding to patterns of previously described larvae of Dytiscinae.
paugus (Fall) as the species of record for Georgia (as Hydroporus) with collection data indicating that these dytiscids have been collected infrequently in only a few counties.
Most dytiscids that feed extra-orally have deep medial mandibular channels for delivery of digestive enzymes into and the ingestion of liquefied materials from prey.
Chaetotaxy of first instar dytiscids provides a number of characters employed in systematic studies.
In addition to Dytiscus carolinus, a number of other dytiscids were using the marsh as a breeding site.