e'en


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e'en 1

 (ēn)
n.
Evening.

e'en 2

 (ēn)
adv.
Even.

e'en

(iːn)
adv, n
a contraction of even2, evening

e'en

(in)

adv. Chiefly Literary.
even.
[1250–1300; Middle English]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.e'en - even
References in classic literature ?
Then, without circumlocution or apology, first pronounced the word "Standish," and placing the unknown engine, already described, to his mouth, from which he drew a high, shrill sound, that was followed by an octave below, from his own voice, he commenced singing the following words, in full, sweet, and melodious tones, that set the music, the poetry, and even the uneasy motion of his ill- trained beast at defiance; "How good it is, O see, And how it pleaseth well, Together e'en in unity, For brethren so to dwell.
To neither love nor reverence wilt thou be kind; and e'en for hate thou canst but kill; and all are killed.
I acknowledged no natural claim on Adele's part to be supported by me, nor do I now acknowledge any, for I am not her father; but hearing that she was quite destitute, I e'en took the poor thing out of the slime and mud of Paris, and transplanted it here, to grow up clean in the wholesome soil of an English country garden.
I was never so beaten with anything in my life: but you must e'en take it as a gift of God; though it's as dark almost as if it came from the devil.
I thought to have lodged him in the solere chamber,'' said he; ``but since he is so unsocial to Christians, e'en let him take the next stall to Isaac the Jew's.
But as to the prize ye must e'en take my word, for I bestowed it upon a maid.
You shamed the Sheriff e'en as I had hoped to do; and we can forego the golden arrow since it is in such fair hands.
My passions, from that hapless hour, Usurp'd a tyranny which men Have deem'd, since I have reach'd to power; My innate nature - be it so: But, father, there liv'd one who, then, Then - in my boyhood - when their fire Burn'd with a still intenser glow,(For passion must, with youth, expire) E'en then who knew this iron heart In woman's weakness had a part.
Nay," said a fourth, "let him e'en go because of his tender years.
The room is e'en clear o' Sir Paitrick, and the leddy's alane, and waitin' for ye.
However, let us e'en venture to slide down together; for Miss Bridget rings her bell, and Mr Allworthy is summoned to breakfast, where I must attend, and, if you please, shall be glad of your company.
They're true to one another, faithfo' to one another, 'fectionate to one another, e'en to death.