e'er


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e'er

 (âr)
adv. Archaic
Ever.

e'er

(ɛə)
adv
poetic or archaic a contraction of ever

EER

energy efficiency ratio.

e'er

(ɛər)

adv. Chiefly Literary.
ever.
[1595–1605]

-eer

a noun-forming suffix occurring orig. in loanwords from French (buccaneer; mutineer; pioneer) and productive in the formation of English nouns denoting persons who produce, handle, or are otherwise associated with the referent of the base word (auctioneer; engineer; mountaineer; pamphleteer); now frequently pejorative (profiteer; racketeer). Compare -ary, -er2, -ier2.
[< French, Middle French -ier (Old French < Latin -ārius -ary as suffix of personal nouns); in some nouns replacing earlier suffixes (see engineer, charioteer) or the French suffix -aire -aire (see musketeer, volunteer)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.e'er - at all timese'er - at all times; all the time and on every occasion; "I will always be there to help you"; "always arrives on time"; "there is always some pollution in the air"; "ever hoping to strike it rich"; "ever busy"
References in classic literature ?
I feel ye now - I feel ye in your strength - O spells more sure than e'er Judæan king Taught in the gardens of Gethsemane
As the Habitation of Augustus was within twelve miles of Town, it was not long e'er we arrived there, and no sooner had we entered Holboun than letting down one of the Front Glasses I enquired of every decent-looking Person that we passed "If they had seen my Edward?
quoth Robin Hood, laughing, "saw ye e'er such a pretty, mincing fellow?
By the bright bow of Heaven, I will have their ill-gotten gains from them, even though I hang for it as high as e'er a forest tree in Sherwood
here thou art, as tight a fellow as e'er I set mine eyes upon.
The world is deep:--and deeper than e'er the day could read.
many a prince has been known To barter his robes for our cowl and our gown, But which of us e'er felt the idle desire To exchange for a crown the grey hood of a Friar!
Oh mother, do not pray your bud should e'er become a rose,
The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow'r,/And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,/Awaits alike th' inevitable hour.
Come, Dear Lerinda, cease admiring Why Crouds and Noise I disapprove; What e'er I see abroad is tiring; O let us to some Cell remove; Where all alone our selves enjoying, Enrich'd with Innocence and Peace, On noblest Themes our Thoughts employing.
at A41540) from Acis and Galatea, and "Where e'er you walk" (Jupiter) ([F.
26) More directly relevant to the subject matter of The Peaceable King was their masque The World Tossed at Tennis, apparently performed at a public theatre in 1620; for all its praise of 'a land of a most glorious peace' (880), the masque's court performance may have been abandoned because it required James to 'play along' with and thus publicly support a conclusion that proposes the 'absolute and complete man' to be both scholar and soldier and promotes Prince Charles as the exemplar of this model (865-71), ending with an unemployed soldier joyously leaving for 'the most glorious wars / That e'er famed Christian kingdom' (878-9).