eaglestone


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eaglestone

(ˈiːɡəlˌstəʊn)
n
(Geological Science) a hollow oval nodule of clay ironstone, formerly thought to have magical properties
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reading The Lord of the Rings, edited by Robert Eaglestone, Continuum, 2005, pp.
Robert Eaglestone suggests that "holocaust fiction is highly intertextual and uses anterior sources much more self-consciously than other genres" and this is true of many of the Bernie Gunther novels (2004, 107).
Victory was claimed by Ysgol Tryfan with a team comprising Katie Eaglestone and Awen Roberts.
Eaglestone also says, "The study of literature has always had a strong involvement with ethics" (Eaglestone 581-82).
Amelia Scott adds a page to the book with Alexander McCalla, Charlotte Eaglestone |and Patrick Eaglestone at the Making Space event in Huddersfield Library with a giant book which they made during the session 141115HBOOK_01.
For example, Robert Eaglestone calls the novel's narrative techniques "kitschily exploitive," (8) and in reference to the ending, he writes that the tragedy of the World Trade Center is "presented like a child's flip book: as you have to flip them you discover that (ta dah, happy ending) the man falls upwards.
The Future of Trauma Theory: Contemporary Literary and Cultural Criticism, edited by Gert Buelens, Samuel Durrant, and Robert Eaglestone.
For a recent overview of the rise of trauma studies, and an attempt at responding to some if its criticism, including Kansteiner's, see Eaglestone (2014).
Eaglestone is affiliated with the University of London, UK.
Whereas the said "creates essence" and "imposes a finite meaning", as Eaglestone observes, the saying implies fragmentation, interruption, questioning, and "the impossibility of denying the other" (144-46).
As Eaglestone explains in Ethical Criticism, "The Saying breaks up identity and opens to the other because it is in the Saying that the finite and limiting strictures of being, of essence, of identity standing alone, are overcome" (1997, 143).