earl


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earl

 (ûrl)
n.
1. A British nobleman next in rank above a viscount and below a marquis, corresponding to a count in continental Europe.
2. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

[Middle English erl, nobleman of high rank, from Old English eorl.]

earl

(ɜːl)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the British Isles) a nobleman ranking below a marquess and above a viscount. Female equivalent: countess
2. (Historical Terms) (in Anglo-Saxon England) a royal governor of any of the large divisions of the kingdom, such as Wessex
[Old English eorl; related to Old Norse jarl chieftain, Old Saxon erl man]

earl

(ɜrl)

n.
a British nobleman of a rank below that of marquis and above that of viscount: called a count for a time after the Norman Conquest. The wife of an earl is a countess.
[before 900; Middle English erl, Old English eorl; c. Old Saxon, Old High German erl man, Old Norse jarl chieftain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.earl - a British peer ranking below a marquess and above a viscountearl - a British peer ranking below a marquess and above a viscount
peer - a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage
Translations
إيرل: لَقَب شَرَف إنجليزي
earljarl
GrafEarl
jaarli
gróf
jarl
comes
grafas
grāfs
conte
grof
Jarl

earl

[ɜːl] Nconde m

earl

[ˈɜːrl] ncomte m
the Earl of ... → le Comte de ...

earl

nGraf m

earl

[ɜːl] nconte m

earl

(əːl) noun
a British nobleman between a marquis and a viscount in rank.
References in classic literature ?
But neither bent the knee, for the young bridegroom replied in a tone that startled all listeners as the mask fell, disclosing the noble face of Ferdinand Devereux, the artist lover, and leaning on the breast where now flashed the star of an English earl was the lovely Viola, radiant with joy and beauty.
It is a sight of the letter, therefore, that we want, that we may know the intentions of the man the earl of Loudon has left among us as his substitute.
An Irish author avers that the Earl of Leicester, on bended knees, did likewise present to her highness another horn, pertaining to a land beast of the unicorn nature.
Master had sold Ginger and me to his old friend, the Earl of W , for he thought we should have a good place there.
Here I was, a giant among pig- mies, a man among children, a master intelligence among intellectual moles: by all rational measurement the one and only actually great man in that whole British world; and yet there and then, just as in the remote England of my birth-time, the sheep-witted earl who could claim long descent from a king's leman, acquired at second-hand from the slums of London, was a better man than I was.
Reed's lace frills, and crimped her nightcap borders, fed our eager attention with passages of love and adventure taken from old fairy tales and other ballads; or (as at a later period I discovered) from the pages of Pamela, and Henry, Earl of Moreland.
The Earl of Leicester was the second,'' continued the Pilgrim; ``Sir Thomas Multon of Gilsland was the third.
But are you not the only child of the late Earl of Huntingdon?
This chair is supposed to have been made of an oak-tree which grew in the park of the English Earl of Lincoln between two and three centuries ago.
When five o'clock arrived, Arthur proposed without any embarrassment this time--to take me with him up to 'the Hall,' in order that I might make acquaintance with the Earl of Ainslie, who had taken it for the season, and renew acquaintance with his daughter Lady Muriel.
Politian is expected Hourly in Rome -- Politian, Earl of Leicester
I don't know what it means, unless it be an earl that wears a belt instead of braces.