earlock

(redirected from earlocks)

ear·lock

 (îr′lŏk′)
n.
A lock of curled hair that hangs in front of the ear.

earlock

(ˈɪərˌlɒk)
n
(Hairdressing & Grooming) a curl or lock of hair close to the ear

ear•lock

(ˈɪərˌlɒk)

n.
a lock of hair worn in front of the ear.
[1765–75]
References in periodicals archive ?
But except for the handful of Chabad children wearing kippot and earlocks playing in the square, there doesn't seem to be much evidence of an actual Jewish presence.
Features unique to the Zoobug rubber frames include innovative flex hinges and earlocks that make it possible to adjust end tips to sit correctly behind the child's ear.
Those here already have an open mind," said Levi Greenberg, an Orthodox Jewish teenager in a colorful knitted kippa (skullcap) twirling his earlocks.
The district court held that: (1) the inmate's beliefs were sincerely held; (2) the policy requiring the inmate to remove his earlocks substantially burdened a tenet of his religion; (3) requiring the inmate to purchase or obtain from a charity a depilatory to comply with the policy did not substantially burden a tenet of the inmate's religion; and (4) summary judgment was precluded by a genuine issue of material fact as to whether the prison policy of refusing to allow the inmate to grow earlocks was the least restrictive means of protecting the prison's compelling interests.
Yahya, wearing traditional Yemeni clothes including a thawb (long white robe), coat and a shawl around his head, can only be identified as a Jew by his curly earlocks.
She was having a Deep-and-Meaningful with one of the Earlocks, or rather she was listening, as he was doing all the talking.
His earlocks tucked in out of sight under his sumata, one could easily have mistaken the rabbi for a Muslim Yemeni, something one takes for granted in this predominantly Muslim country.
That was anyway how it was put by a boy in a crocheted skullcap with serpentine earlocks, who looked nothing at all like the Angel: this one was well fed and apple-cheeked despite the difficult journey.
Nor is there a particular Jewish look, they observe, viewing a photograph of a Hassid with earlocks, something confirmed by the parade of Jews they bring in for Fleischman's minyan.
Potok was born to Polish immigrants, and he comments, "I grew up in a Hasidic world without the beard and the earlocks.
Now without earlocks, and having shaved his once long beard more closely to his face, he is hardly recognizable.
Every cent people donate to us is used to help the needy," says the bearded rabbi who, like his ultra-Orthodox counterparts in New York, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, and Jerusalem, wears a black hat, white shirt, black suit, and "payes," or earlocks.