Earthquakes


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Earthquakes

See also geology.

an earthquake occurring at very deep levels of the earth.
the slow upward and downward motion of the earth’s crust. — bradyseismic, adj.
any major disaster, as an earthquake, flood, etc. See also water. — cataclysmal, adj.
a line drawn about an epicenter through all points affected by the same seismic shock. — coseismic, adj.
a point on the earth’s surface directly above the true center of the seismic disturbance from which the shock waves of an earthquake seem to radiate.
a major earthquake. — macroseismic, adj.
a violent earthquake. — megaseismic, adj.
an almost imperceptible earth tremor caused by a violent sea storm or an earthquake and detected only by a microseismometer. — microseismic, adj.
the intensity, frequency, and distribution of earthquakes in a specific area.
an earthquake. — seismic, adj.
the record of an earthquake’s vibrations and intensity made by a seismograph.
any of various devices for measuring and recording the vibrations and intensities of earthquakes. — seismographer, n. — seismographic, seismographical, adj.
1. the scientific measuring and recording of the shock and vibrations of earthquakes.
2. seismology.
the branch of geology that studies earthquakes and their effects. Also seismography. — seismologist, n. — seismologic, seismological, adj.
a special seismograph equipped to measure the actual movement of the ground. — seismometry, n. — seismometric, adj.
an earthquake that occurs in a part of the world far away from a recording station. — teleseismic, adj.
an instrument for detecting or measuring very slight earth tremors.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Probably the mother during an important interval was sailing down the Peruvian coast, when earthquakes caused the beach to gape.
A gigantic eruption, like that of Krakatoa a few years ago, with the accompanying earthquakes, tidal waves, and clouds of volcanic dust, changes the face of the surrounding landscape beyond recognition, bringing down the high lands, elevating the low, making fair lakes where deserts had been, and deserts where green prairies had smiled before.
Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men
It is not to be denied that the crown of France has always remained firm upon the heads of its kings," Anne of Austria hastened to say, "and that it has fallen off of that of the king of England; and when by chance that crown oscillated a little, -- for there are throne-quakes as well as earthquakes, -- every time, I say, that rebellion threatened it, a good victory restored tranquillity.
After the Wax-moth has grown strong, a Shadow will fall across the gate; a Voice will speak from behind a Veil; there will be Light, and Hot Smoke, and earthquakes, and those who live will see everything that they have done, all together in one place, burned up in one great fire.
It will have been, by that time, totally destroyed, at three different periods, by three successive earthquakes.
And it is much more likely, that the destruction that hath heretofore been there, was not by earthquakes (as the Egyptian priest told Solon concerning the island of Atlantis, that it was swallowed by an earthquake), but rather that it was desolated by a particular deluge.
With a similar perverseness, the potatoes crumble off forks in the process of peeling, upheaving from their centres in every direction, as if they were subject to earthquakes.
Seen moving about, far away in the dim, arched aisles of the Great Bazaar, they look as the shrouded dead must have looked when they walked forth from their graves amid the storms and thunders and earthquakes that burst upon Calvary that awful night of the Crucifixion.
This sort of thing has always been happening, I suppose--these things, wars and earthquakes, that sweep across all the decency of life.
Do you intend Tamburlaine to represent earthquakes and volcanoes?
85: Some say that great earthquakes occurred, which broke through the neck of land and formed the straits (3), the sea parting the mainland from the island.