earthworm


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earth·worm

 (ûrth′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various terrestrial annelid worms of the class Oligochaeta, especially those of the family Lumbricidae, that burrow into and help aerate and enrich soil.

earthworm

(ˈɜːθˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any of numerous oligochaete worms of the genera Lumbricus, Allolobophora, Eisenia, etc, which burrow in the soil and help aerate and break up the ground.

earth•worm

(ˈɜrθˌwɜrm)

n.
any annelid worm that burrows in soil, esp. a worm of the genus Lumbricus.
[1400–50]

earth·worm

(ûrth′wûrm′)
Any of various segmented worms living in the ground that burrow into and enrich soil. Earthworms are annelids, related to the leeches, and vary in size from a few inches to 11 feet (3 meters) in length. See Note at worm.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.earthworm - terrestrial worm that burrows into and helps aerate soilearthworm - terrestrial worm that burrows into and helps aerate soil; often surfaces when the ground is cool or wet; used as bait by anglers
oligochaete, oligochaete worm - hermaphroditic terrestrial and aquatic annelids having bristles borne singly along the length of the body

earthworm

noun
Related words
adjective lumbricoid
Translations
دودَة أرْض
regnorm
lombrizmala persona
kastemato
földigiliszta
ánamaîkur
ミミズ
dážďovka

earthworm

[ˈɜːθwɜːm] Nlombriz f

earthworm

[ˈɜːrθwɜːrm] nver m de terre

earthworm

[ˈɜːθˌwɜːm] nlombrico

earth

(əːð) noun
1. the third planet in order of distance from the Sun; the planet on which we live. Is Earth nearer the Sun than Mars is?; the geography of the earth.
2. the world as opposed to heaven. heaven and earth.
3. soil. Fill the plant-pot with earth.
4. dry land; the ground. the earth, sea and sky.
5. a burrow or hole of an animal, especially of a fox.
6. (a wire that provides) an electrical connection with the earth.
verb
to connect to earth electrically. Is your washing-machine properly earthed?
ˈearthen adjective
(of a floor etc) made of earth.
ˈearthly adjective
1. of or belonging to this world; not heavenly or spiritual. this earthly life.
2. possible. This gadget has no earthly use.
ˈearthenware noun, adjective
(of) a kind of pottery coarser than china. an earthenware dish.
ˈearthquake noun
a shaking of the earth's surface. The village was destroyed by an earthquake.
ˈearthworm noun
(usually worm) a kind of small animal with a ringed body and no backbone, living in damp earth.
on earth
used for emphasis. What on earth are you doing?; the stupidest man on earth.
run to earth
to find (something or someone) after a long search. He ran his friend to earth in the pub.

earthworm

n. lombriz de tierra; gusano.
References in classic literature ?
No lower estimate could have vindicated the indefatigable zeal with which she scratched, and her unscrupulousness in digging up the choicest flower or vegetable, for the sake of the fat earthworm at its root.
The giants came up, and the first pushed him with his foot, and said, 'What sort of an earthworm is that?
I did my Biology at University College,--getting out the ovary of the earthworm and the radula of the snail, and all that.
Athwart that waving hair, more glossy than the plumage of a raven, a thick, rough, gray rope was visible, twisted and knotted, chafing her delicate collar-bones and twining round the charming neck of the poor girl, like an earthworm round a flower.
Why, I have nine grades in my school and I have to teach a little of everything, from investigating the interiors of earthworms to the study of the solar system.
D Russell, Loanhead, Midlothian | There are 27 species of earthworm living naturally in the UK.
Alternatively, earthworm can also be used in fish feed as a protein source [26].
Earthworm species and populations vary widely with the ecosystem management, such as differences in tillage, nutrient and pesticide inputs, and crop rotation (Lavelle 2002).
EACH earthworm is both male and female, producing both eggs and sperm.
FULL size for an earthworm varies among species, ranging from less than half an inch long to nearly 10 feet.
The British broadcaster explained that he and his fellow pupils knew that the subject of the practical part of the biology exam was to be either a rabbit, a dogfish, a crayfish, a frog or an earthworm, and since it was at the time of the war they used to eat rabbits and dogfish, so it was not going to be them, the Daily Express reported.