eaves


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eaves

 (ēvz)
pl.n.
The projecting overhang at the lower edge of a roof.

[Middle English eves, from Old English efes; see upo in Indo-European roots.]

eaves

(iːvz)
pl n
(Architecture) the edge of a roof that projects beyond the wall
[Old English efes; related to Gothic ubizwa porch, Greek hupsos height]

eaves

- Its etymological meaning is "going over the edge, projecting."
See also related terms for projecting.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eaves - the overhang at the lower edge of a roofeaves - the overhang at the lower edge of a roof
overhang - projection that extends beyond or hangs over something else
roof - a protective covering that covers or forms the top of a building
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
حافَّة السَّطْح
tagskæg
eresz
òakskegg
dzega
odkvap

eaves

[iːvz] NPLalero msing

eaves

[ˈiːvz] nplavant-toit m

eaves

plDachvorsprung m

eaves

[ˈiːvz] nplgronda sg

eaves

(iːvz) noun plural
the edge of the roof sticking out beyond the wall. There are birds nesting under the eaves.
References in classic literature ?
The farmhouses were my delight, with thatched roofs, ivy up to the eaves, latticed windows, and stout women with rosy children at the doors.
Already time had begun a little to color the stone, lending a golden richness to its surface and in the evening or on dark days touching the shaded places beneath the eaves with wavering patches of browns and blacks.
The roof was so steep that the eaves were not much above the forest of tall hollyhocks, now brown and in seed.
There was the old gray house with its sloping eaves.
Gradually, they have sunk almost out of sight; as old houses, here and there about the streets, get covered half-way to the eaves by the accumulation of new soil.
It was one of those spacious farmhouses, with high- ridged but lowly sloping roofs, built in the style handed down from the first Dutch settlers; the low projecting eaves forming a piazza along the front, capable of being closed up in bad weather.
Some two years prior to my first learning the events which I am about rehearsing to you, gentlemen, the Town-Ho, Sperm Whaler of Nantucket, was cruising in your Pacific here, not very many days' sail westward from the eaves of this good Golden Inn.
When Emmeline reached the garret, she found an immense box, in which some heavy pieces of furniture had once been brought, turned on its side, so that the opening faced the wall, or rather the eaves.
All that evening I sat by my fire at the Warwick Arms, steeped in a dream of the olden time, while the rain beat upon the windows, and the wind roared about the eaves and corners.
The mimic royalty on the stage, with their soaked satins clinging to their bodies, slopped about ankle-deep in water, warbling their sweetest and best, the fiddlers under the eaves of the state sawed away for dear life, with the cold overflow spouting down the backs of their necks, and the dry and happy King sat in his lofty box and wore his gloves to ribbons applauding.
Betwixt the hut and the fence, on the back side, was a lean-to that joined the hut at the eaves, and was made out of plank.
And the old lame horse in the stable was glad to see him; and so were the swallows who had already built their nests under the eaves of his roof and had young ones.