ecclesiastical


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Related to ecclesiastical: ecclesiastical law

ec·cle·si·as·ti·cal

 (ĭ-klē′zē-ăs′tĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a church, especially as an organized institution.
2. Appropriate to a church or to use in a church: ecclesiastical architecture; ecclesiastical robes.

ec·cle′si·as′ti·cal·ly adv.

ecclesiastical

(ɪˌkliːzɪˈæstɪkəl) or

ecclesial

adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to the Christian Church
ecˌclesiˈastically adv

ec•cle•si•as•ti•cal

(ɪˌkli ziˈæs tɪ kəl)

adj.
of or pertaining to the church or the clergy; churchly; clerical; not secular.
[1375–1425]
ec•cle`si•as′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ecclesiastical - of or associated with a church (especially a Christian Church); "ecclesiastic history"

ecclesiastical

adjective clerical, religious, church, churchly, priestly, spiritual, holy, divine, pastoral, sacerdotal He refused to acknowledge the ecclesiastical supremacy of the monarch.

ecclesiastical

adjective
Of or relating to a church or to an established religion:
Translations
církevní
kirkollinen

ecclesiastical

[ɪˌkliːzɪˈæstɪkəl] ADJeclesiástico

ecclesiastical

[ɪˌkliːziˈæstɪkəl] adjecclésiastique

ecclesiastical

adjkirchlich

ecclesiastical

[ɪˌkliːzɪˈæstɪkl] adjecclesiastico/a
References in classic literature ?
There are no such things as marble kisses or ice kisses, or I should say my ecclesiastical cousin's salute belonged to one of these classes; but there may be experiment kisses, and his was an experiment kiss.
Noel Vanstone ever discovers that you have knowingly married him under a false name, he can apply to the Ecclesiastical Court to have his marriage declared null and void.
It's a little out-of-the-way place, where they administer what is called ecclesiastical law, and play all kinds of tricks with obsolete old monsters of acts of Parliament, which three-fourths of the world know nothing about, and the other fourth supposes to have been dug up, in a fossil state, in the days of the Edwards.
But his greatest trials were in the churchyard: which had the appearance of a primeval forest, with a kind of small ecclesiastical wash-house on one side, and a turnpike gate on the other.
The landlord agreed with this view, and after taking the sense of the company, and duly rehearsing a small ceremony known in high ecclesiastical life as the nolo episcopari, he consented to take on himself the chill dignity of going to Kench's.
The saddle and housings of this superb palfrey were covered by a long foot-cloth, which reached nearly to the ground, and on which were richly embroidered, mitres, crosses, and other ecclesiastical emblems.
He had a special passion, also, for ecclesiastical vestments, as indeed he had for everything connected with the service of the Church.
Many, they say, abandoned all the pleasures and vanities of life for solitude and religious austerities; others devoted themselves to God in an ecclesiastical life; they who could not do these set apart their revenues for building churches, endowing chapels, and founding monasteries, and spent their wealth in costly ornaments for the churches and vessels for the altars.
The contest embraced within its compass not only theological doctrines, but political principles, and Maurice and Barnevelt were the temporal leaders of the same rival factions, of which Episcopius and Polyander were the ecclesiastical champions.
The precise extent of the common law, and the statute law, the maritime law, the ecclesiastical law, the law of corporations, and other local laws and customs, remains still to be clearly and finally established in Great Britain, where accuracy in such subjects has been more industriously pursued than in any other part of the world.
At home they might hear political and ecclesiastical secrets intended not for them but for their husbands and brothers, and might even issue commands in the name of a priestly Circle; out of doors the striking combination of red and green, without addition of any other colours, would be sure to lead the common people into endless mistakes, and the Women would gain whatever the Circles lost, in the deference of the passers by.
He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts.