ecclesiastical calendar


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ecclesiastical calendar - a calendar of the Christian year indicating the dates of fasts and festivals
Gregorian calendar, New Style calendar - the solar calendar now in general use, introduced by Gregory XIII in 1582 to correct an error in the Julian calendar by suppressing 10 days, making Oct 5 be called Oct 15, and providing that only centenary years divisible by 400 should be leap years; it was adopted by Great Britain and the American colonies in 1752
Holy Week, Passion Week - the week before Easter
Advent - the season including the four Sundays preceding Christmas
Shrovetide - immediately preceding Lent
Lent, Lententide - a period of 40 weekdays from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday
Whitsun, Whitsuntide, Whitweek - Christian holiday; the week beginning on Whitsunday (especially the first 3 days)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the finale to her account (507-26), Koller surveys the situation in Germany's Protestant neighbour states, among whom Denmark-Norway used the occasion to participate in the reform of 1700, while Sweden and Great Britain decided to emend the civil and ecclesiastical calendar at their own pace.
The dating style that nails a letter to a specific day (or date) of the ecclesiastical calendar was commonly employed.
With this, at least, Christians may have sympathized: "Christian experts on the ecclesiastical calendar took care to learn about the Jewish holidays as well.
To confuse the matter slightly the tax year in the UK actually starts on April 6, which reflects the old ecclesiastical calendar.
Disputes between the churches also arose over rituals, the ecclesiastical calendar, the use of unleavened or leavened bread in the celebration of the Eucharist, the question about whether clergy should marry, and what the creed should include.
The experience of time also changed as the ecclesiastical calendar was revised and as saints' days lost much of their earlier significance.
In the ecclesiastical calendar St Barnabas Day (June 11) was traditionally the day haymaking would commence, but it has been discovered that this is also the day gooseberry growers begin to thin their crops with the aim of growing fewer but much larger potentially prize worthy fruits.
Consequently, the discrepancy between the ecclesiastical calendar and the astronomical reality grew.
Ash Wednesday is fixed into the ecclesiastical calendar.
Basil is celebrated throughout the year with special additions particular to the day of the ecclesiastical calendar.