ecclesiological


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Related to ecclesiological: Ecclesiologists

ec·cle·si·ol·o·gy

 (ĭ-klē′zē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the nature, constitution, and functions of a church.
2. The study of ecclesiastical architecture and ornamentation.


ec·cle′si·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars and pastors devoted to serious ecclesiological projects will find this small book valuable both historically and theologically.
3), the decree formulated the ecumenical consequences of the new articulation of the ecclesiological self-understanding of the Roman Catholic Church in the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Rumen Gentium).
2) As the title indicates, the task of this essay is to assess Staniloae's understanding of the intratrinitarian relationship between the Son and the Holy Spirit and its significance for the ecclesiological synthesis between Christology and pneumatology.
The first covers the period from 1957, the beginning of F&O in the United States, to 1971, dealing with regional aspects such as the characteristics of the United States as an immigrant nation, the ecclesiological significance of councils of churches, sociopolitical and gender contexts, and local ecumenism.
Chapters two through six examine various aspects of the New Connexion including theological developments, ecclesiological structure, social and demographic characteristics, evangelistic strategies, and the theology of ministry.
In my last few columns I have been exploring the major ecclesiological themes or principles proclaimed by the Second Vatican Council (1962-65).
The strong focus on ecclesiological concerns among early Anabaptists, Bollinger argues, "contributed to a practical and theological imbalance resulting in rapid divisions .
The resolution requests that the faith, worship and ministry committee and the governance working group provide advice on the "theological, ecclesiological, legal and constitutional implications of the decision to adopt or not adopt the Covenant.
While an ocean of questions surfaces in the wake of his essay--theological, ecclesiological, practical--it is this kind of pastoral and creative thinking that is needed in the church today.
He said: "It is an imaginative pastoral response to the needs of some, but it does not break any fresh ecclesiological (relating to the theory of the nature of the church) ground.
His published work--especially on English cathedrals and their building histories--always transcended the narrowly ecclesiological or merely antiquarian.
He traces the changing nature of the church-state relationship after 1828 and the ecclesiological debates between High and Low but he also shows that however things changed the commitment to evangelising the growing Empire, even if confined to a minority, never wavered.