eclipse


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Related to eclipse: solar eclipse
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eclipse
solar eclipse

e·clipse

 (ĭ-klĭps′)
n.
1.
a. The partial or complete obscuring, relative to a designated observer, of one celestial body by another.
b. The period of time during which such an obscuration occurs.
2. A temporary or permanent dimming or cutting off of light.
3.
a. A fall into obscurity or disuse; a decline: "A composer ... often goes into eclipse after his death and never regains popularity" (Time).
b. A disgraceful or humiliating end; a downfall: Revelations of wrongdoing helped bring about the eclipse of the governor's career.
tr.v. e·clipsed, e·clips·ing, e·clips·es
1.
a. To cause an eclipse of.
b. To obscure; darken.
2.
a. To obscure or diminish in importance, fame, or reputation.
b. To surpass; outshine: an outstanding performance that eclipsed the previous record.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin eclīpsis, from Greek ekleipsis, from ekleipein, to fail to appear, suffer an eclipse : ek-, out; see ecto- + leipein, to leave; see leikw- in Indo-European roots.]

eclipse

(ɪˈklɪps)
n
1. (Astronomy) the total or partial obscuring of reflected light from a celestial body as a result of its passage through the shadow of another. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes through the shadow of the earth. See also solar eclipse, total eclipse, partial eclipse, annular eclipse Compare occultation
2. (Astronomy) the period of time during which such a phenomenon occurs
3. any dimming or obstruction of light
4. a loss of importance, power, fame, etc, esp through overshadowing by another
vb (tr)
5. (Astronomy) to cause an eclipse of
6. to cast a shadow upon; darken; obscure
7. to overshadow or surpass in importance, power, etc
[C13: back formation from Old English eclypsis, from Latin eclīpsis, from Greek ekleipsis a forsaking, from ekleipein to abandon, from leipein to leave]
eˈclipser n

e•clipse

(ɪˈklɪps)

n., v. e•clipsed, e•clips•ing. n.
1.
a. the obscuring of the light of the moon by the intervention of the earth between it and the sun (lunar eclipse) or the obscuring of the light of the sun by the intervention of the moon between it and a point on the earth (solar eclipse).
b. a similar phenomenon with respect to any other planet, its moon, and the sun.
c. the partial or complete interception of the light of one component of a binary star by the other.
2. any obscuring of light.
3. a reduction or loss of splendor, status, or reputation.
v.t.
4. to cause to undergo eclipse: The moon eclipsed the sun.
5. to make less outstanding or important by comparison; surpass.
[1250–1300; < Old French eclipse < Latin eclīpsis < Greek ékleipsis, derivative of ekleípein to leave out, fail to appear]
e•clips′er, n.
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eclipse
A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. An observer within the umbra will witness a total solar eclipse, while someone within the penumbra will observe a partial solar eclipse.

e·clipse

(ĭ-klĭps′)
The partial or total blocking of light from one celestial body as it passes behind or through the shadow of another celestial body. ♦ In a solar eclipse the moon comes between the sun and Earth. ♦ In a lunar eclipse the moon enters Earth's shadow.
Did You Know? Purely by chance, the sun is about 400 times wider than the moon but also 400 times farther from Earth. For this reason, they appear to be almost exactly the same size in the sky. Our unique vantage point makes for the spectacular phenomenon of a total solar eclipse, when the moon blocks out the sun. A total solar eclipse reveals the beautiful and delicate corona, wispy tendrils of charged gases that surround the sun but are invisible to the unaided eye in normal sunlight. The orbits of Earth around the sun and of the moon around Earth are not perfect circles. Therefore the sun and moon may vary slightly in how big they appear to us, and the length of total solar eclipses can also vary. The maximum duration of a solar eclipse, however, when Earth is farthest from the sun and the moon is nearest to Earth, is only seven and a half minutes. Since looking at the sun can cause blindness, it is safest to view any solar eclipse indirectly. A good method is to project the image through a pinhole in a piece of paper onto another piece of paper.

eclipse


Past participle: eclipsed
Gerund: eclipsing

Imperative
eclipse
eclipse
Present
I eclipse
you eclipse
he/she/it eclipses
we eclipse
you eclipse
they eclipse
Preterite
I eclipsed
you eclipsed
he/she/it eclipsed
we eclipsed
you eclipsed
they eclipsed
Present Continuous
I am eclipsing
you are eclipsing
he/she/it is eclipsing
we are eclipsing
you are eclipsing
they are eclipsing
Present Perfect
I have eclipsed
you have eclipsed
he/she/it has eclipsed
we have eclipsed
you have eclipsed
they have eclipsed
Past Continuous
I was eclipsing
you were eclipsing
he/she/it was eclipsing
we were eclipsing
you were eclipsing
they were eclipsing
Past Perfect
I had eclipsed
you had eclipsed
he/she/it had eclipsed
we had eclipsed
you had eclipsed
they had eclipsed
Future
I will eclipse
you will eclipse
he/she/it will eclipse
we will eclipse
you will eclipse
they will eclipse
Future Perfect
I will have eclipsed
you will have eclipsed
he/she/it will have eclipsed
we will have eclipsed
you will have eclipsed
they will have eclipsed
Future Continuous
I will be eclipsing
you will be eclipsing
he/she/it will be eclipsing
we will be eclipsing
you will be eclipsing
they will be eclipsing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been eclipsing
you have been eclipsing
he/she/it has been eclipsing
we have been eclipsing
you have been eclipsing
they have been eclipsing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been eclipsing
you will have been eclipsing
he/she/it will have been eclipsing
we will have been eclipsing
you will have been eclipsing
they will have been eclipsing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been eclipsing
you had been eclipsing
he/she/it had been eclipsing
we had been eclipsing
you had been eclipsing
they had been eclipsing
Conditional
I would eclipse
you would eclipse
he/she/it would eclipse
we would eclipse
you would eclipse
they would eclipse
Past Conditional
I would have eclipsed
you would have eclipsed
he/she/it would have eclipsed
we would have eclipsed
you would have eclipsed
they would have eclipsed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eclipse - one celestial body obscures anothereclipse - one celestial body obscures another
egress, emersion - (astronomy) the reappearance of a celestial body after an eclipse
ingress, immersion - (astronomy) the disappearance of a celestial body prior to an eclipse
break, interruption - some abrupt occurrence that interrupts an ongoing activity; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt"
solar eclipse - the moon interrupts light from the sun
lunar eclipse - the earth interrupts light shining on the moon
total eclipse - an eclipse as seen from a place where the eclipsed body is completely obscured
partial eclipse - an eclipse in which the eclipsed body is only partially obscured
Verb1.eclipse - be greater in significance than; "the tragedy overshadowed the couple's happiness"
bulk large, brood, loom, hover - hang over, as of something threatening, dark, or menacing; "The terrible vision brooded over her all day long"
2.eclipse - cause an eclipse of (a celestial body) by intervention; "The Sun eclipses the moon today"; "Planets and stars often are occulted by other celestial bodies"
overshadow - cast a shadow upon; "The tall tree overshadowed the house"

eclipse

noun
2. decline, fall, loss, failure, weakening, deterioration, degeneration, diminution the eclipse of the influence of the Republican party in West Germany
verb
1. surpass, exceed, overshadow, excel, transcend, outdo, outclass, outshine, leave or put in the shade (informal) The gramophone was eclipsed by the compact disc.
2. obscure, cover, block, cloud, conceal, dim, veil, darken, shroud, extinguish, blot out The sun was eclipsed by the moon.

eclipse

verb
Translations
كُسوف الشَّمْس، خُسوف القَمَريَتَفَوَّقيَكْسِفُ الشَّمْس أو القَمَر
zatmění
eklipseformørkeoverskyggesolformørkelse
jättää varjoonsapimennyspimentää
pomrčina
fogyatkozás
myrkva; skyggja ámyrkviskyggja á, bera afsólmyrkvi
eclipsis
užtemdytiužtemimas
aizēnotaptumšotaptumsums
byť v zatmenízatmenie
mrk
gölgelemektutulmatutulmak

eclipse

[ɪˈklɪps]
A. Neclipse m
partial/total eclipseeclipse m parcial/total
B. VT (lit, fig) → eclipsar

eclipse

[ɪˈklɪps]
n [sun, moon] → éclipse f
vt (= surpass) → éclipser
to be eclipsed by sth → être éclipsé(e) par qch

eclipse

n (Astron) → Eklipse f (spec), → Finsternis f; (fig) (of fame, theory)Verblassen nt; (of person)Niedergang m; eclipse of the sun/moonSonnen-/Mondfinsternis f; to be in eclipse (sun, moon)verfinstert sein; (fig)in der Versenkung verschwunden sein
vt (fig)in den Schatten stellen

eclipse

[ɪˈklɪps]
1. neclissi f inv
2. vteclissare

eclipse

(iˈklips) noun
the disappearance of the whole or part of the sun when the moon comes between it and the earth, or of the moon when the earth's shadow falls across it. When was the last total eclipse of the sun?
verb
1. to obscure or cut off the light or sight of (the sun or moon). The sun was partially eclipsed at 9 a.m.
2. to be much better than. His great success eclipsed his brother's achievements.
References in classic literature ?
The unusual spectacle of her busy mother rocking comfortably and reading early in the morning made Jo feel as if some unnatural phenomenon had occurred, for an eclipse, an earthquake, or a volcanic eruption would hardly have seemed stranger.
I knew that the only total eclipse of the sun in the first half of the sixth century occurred on the 21st of June, A.
And not only did my handwriting completely eclipse that of the merchants, but it is hardly too much to say that none so beautiful had ever before been seen in that country.
For a minute perhaps I stared aghast at this blackness that was creeping over the day, and then I realized that an eclipse was beginning.
He had not so noble an air as Athos, and the commencement of their intimacy often rendered him unjust toward that gentleman, whom he endeavored to eclipse by his splendid dress.
As the huntress Diana goes forth upon the mountains of Taygetus or Erymanthus to hunt wild boars or deer, and the wood nymphs, daughters of Aegis-bearing Jove, take their sport along with her (then is Leto proud at seeing her daughter stand a full head taller than the others, and eclipse the loveliest amid a whole bevy of beauties), even so did the girl outshine her handmaids.
Now these colored spectacles probably darkened the Cynic's sight, in at least as great a degree as the smoked glasses through which people gaze at an eclipse.
Their whole time is expended and their ingenuity tasked by endeavors to eclipse each other in dress and decoration.
Moreover, Bartle Massey was not at church, and Joshua's importance in the choir suffered no eclipse.
Refinement he did not affect, yet vulgar he could not be called; he was not odd--no quiz--yet he resembled no one else I had ever seen before; his general bearing intimated complete, sovereign satisfaction with himself; yet, at times, an indescribable shade passed like an eclipse over his countenance, and seemed to me like the sign of a sudden and strong inward doubt of himself, his words and actions-an energetic discontent at his life or his social position, his future prospects or his mental attainments--I know not which; perhaps after all it might only be a bilious caprice.
These they put in their hats, and thus figured about Mackinaw, assuming airs of vast importance, as "voyageurs" in a new company, that was to eclipse the Northwest.
And then a smile covered his own personal dignity, which in this critical situation he was resolved to keep immaculate; it was quite enough that the glory of his house should pass into eclipse.