economy-class syndrome

Related to economy-class syndrome: deep venous thrombosis

economy-class syndrome

n
(not in technical usage) the development of a deep-vein thrombosis in the legs or pelvis of a person travelling for a long period of time in cramped conditions
[C20: reference to the restricted legroom of cheaper seats on passenger aircraft]
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The likely explanation for the phenomenon, sometimes called economy-class syndrome, is that long periods of sitting promote clots, particularly in susceptible people, investigators say.
DVT, also known as economy-class syndrome, is a potentially fatal condition in which blood forms clots during long periods of inactivity in cramped seating such as aircraft seats.
HOLIDAYING outside Europe could triple surgery patients' chances of developing so-called economy-class syndrome, a panel of health experts and MPs has warned.
A medical society suggested Thursday that economy-class syndrome, a potentially fatal condition caused by long flights in cramped seats, should be renamed ''passengers' thrombosis'' as it affects travelers using a wide range of transport.
However, publicity has centered on the possibility that one or more of the Economy-Class Syndrome fatalities may have occurred without prior symptoms or known risk.
DVT - also known as economy-class syndrome - occurs when blood clots form in the legs.
LONG-haul air travellers may be able to reduce the risk of economy-class syndrome - deep vein thrombosis - by taking the herb ginkgo biloba.
The seats will be used as part of a study into the so-called economy-class syndrome by the World Health Organisation (WHO).
All Nippon Airways' (ANA) 24-hour service system for in-flight medical care of illnesses that arise on its international flights, including economy-class syndrome, is proving highly effective, ANA officials said Wednesday.
According to his findings, 40% of airlines said they had not even heard of the condition - also known as economy-class syndrome - while 55% provided what he called 'inadequate, misleading or dangerous' advice.