ecstatic


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ec·stat·ic

 (ĕk-stăt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Marked by or expressing ecstasy.
2. Being in a state of ecstasy; joyful or enraptured.

[French extatique, from Greek ekstatikos, from ekstasis, distraction; see ecstasy.]

ec·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

ecstatic

(ɛkˈstætɪk)
adj
1. in a trancelike state of great rapture or delight
2. showing or feeling great enthusiasm: ecstatic applause.
n
a person who has periods of intense trancelike joy
ecˈstatically adv

ec•stat•ic

(ɛkˈstæt ɪk)

adj.
1. of or characterized by ecstasy.
2. subject to or in a state of ecstasy.
n.
3. a person subject to fits of ecstasy.
[1620–30; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin < Greek]
ec•stat′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ecstatic - feeling great rapture or delight
joyous - full of or characterized by joy; "felt a joyous abandon"; "joyous laughter"

ecstatic

adjective rapturous, entranced, enthusiastic, frenzied, joyous, fervent, joyful, elated, over the moon (informal), overjoyed, blissful, delirious, euphoric, enraptured, on cloud nine (informal), cock-a-hoop, blissed out, transported, rhapsodic, sent, walking on air, in seventh heaven, floating on air, in exaltation, in transports of delight He was ecstatic about the birth of his first child.
Translations
begejstretekstatisk
elragadtatott
frá sér numinn
extatický
kendinden geçmişmest

ecstatic

[eksˈtætɪk] ADJ (Rel) → extático (fig) → contentísimo, eufórico

ecstatic

[ɛkˈstætɪk] adj [person] → extatique, en extase; [reception, welcome] → triomphal(e)
to be ecstatic → être en extase

ecstatic

ecstatic

[ɛksˈtætɪk] adjestatico/a, in estasi

ecstasy

(ˈekstəsi)
1. noun, plural ˈecstasies (a feeling of) very great joy or other overwhelming emotion.
2. (no plural) a narcotic drug.
ecˈstatic (-ˈstӕ-) adjective
an ecstatic mood.
ecˈstatically adverb
References in classic literature ?
It was a July midnight; and from out A full-orbed moon, that, like thine own soul, soaring, Sought a precipitate pathway up through heaven, There fell a silvery-silken veil of light, With quietude, and sultriness, and slumber, Upon the upturned faces of a thousand Roses that grew in an enchanted garden, Where no wind dared to stir, unless on tiptoe -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That gave out, in return for the love-light, Their odorous souls in an ecstatic death -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That smiled and died in this parterre, enchanted By thee, and by the poetry of thy presence.
Perhaps Sinbad or Christian could have conceived of my ecstatic relief; yet so far as the popular vision reached I was not returning to literature, but to the printing business, and I myself felt the difference.
His pleasure in music, though it amounted not to that ecstatic delight which alone could sympathize with her own, was estimable when contrasted against the horrible insensibility of the others; and she was reasonable enough to allow that a man of five and thirty might well have outlived all acuteness of feeling and every exquisite power of enjoyment.
They drew away and waited in ecstatic awe for that which was about to happen.
she said, coming closer to him, and looking at him with an ecstatic smile of love.
Having seen that it was really her lover who had advanced, and no one else, her lips parted, and she sank upon him in her momentary joy, with something very like an ecstatic cry.
Young Rostov's ecstatic voice could be heard above the three hundred others.
Having gone for a time to reside in a rabbit country Porthos was elated to discover at last something small that ran from him, and developing at once into an ecstatic sportsman he did pound hotly in pursuit, though always over-shooting the mark by a hundred yards or so and wondering very much what had become of the rabbit.
The wretched girl believed Mirabel with such an ecstatic sense of belief that she trembled in every limb, and dropped into the nearest chair.
She let me hold it for a moment, and I saw a flash of ecstatic brilliance in her eye, a glow of glad excitement on her face - I thought my hour of victory was come - but instantly a painful recollection seemed to flash upon her; a cloud of anguish darkened her brow, a marble paleness blanched her cheek and lip; there seemed a moment of inward conflict, and, with a sudden effort, she withdrew her hand, and retreated a step or two back.
In this our heroe was certainly the principal character; for as he probably felt more ecstatic delight in having saved Sophia than she herself received from being saved, so neither were the congratulations paid to her equal to what were conferred on Jones, especially by Mr Western himself, who, after having once or twice embraced his daughter, fell to hugging and kissing Jones.
Felix seemed ravished with delight when he saw her, every trait of sorrow vanished from his face, and it instantly expressed a degree of ecstatic joy, of which I could hardly have believed it capable; his eyes sparkled, as his cheek flushed with pleasure; and at that moment I thought him as beautiful as the stranger.