edict


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e·dict

 (ē′dĭkt′)
n.
1. A decree or proclamation issued by an authority and having the force of law.
2. A formal pronouncement or command.

[Latin ēdictum, from neuter past participle of ēdīcere, to declare : ē-, ex-, ex- + dīcere, to speak; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

edict

(ˈiːdɪkt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2. any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
[C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare]
eˈdictal adj
eˈdictally adv

e•dict

(ˈi dɪkt)

n.
1. a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority.
2. any authoritative proclamation or command.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, n. use of neuter of ēdictus, past participle of ēdīcere to decree, proclaim =ē- e- + dīcere to say]
e•dic′tal, adj.
e•dic′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.edict - a formal or authoritative proclamationedict - a formal or authoritative proclamation
announcement, proclamation, annunciation, declaration - a formal public statement; "the government made an announcement about changes in the drug war"; "a declaration of independence"
2.edict - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge)edict - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); "a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there"
act, enactment - a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body
consent decree - an agreement between two parties that is sanctioned by the court; for example, a company might agree to stop certain questionable practices without admitting guilt
curfew - an order that after a specific time certain activities (as being outside on the streets) are prohibited
decree nisi - a decree issued on a first petition for divorce; becomes absolute at some later date
imperial decree - a decree issued by a sovereign ruler
judicial separation, legal separation - a judicial decree regulating the rights and responsibilities of a married couple living apart
programma - an edict that has been publicly posted
ban, proscription, prohibition - a decree that prohibits something
stay - a judicial order forbidding some action until an event occurs or the order is lifted; "the Supreme Court has the power to stay an injunction pending an appeal to the whole Court"
papal bull, bull - a formal proclamation issued by the pope (usually written in antiquated characters and sealed with a leaden bulla)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

edict

noun decree, law, act, order, ruling, demand, command, regulation, dictate, mandate, canon, manifesto, injunction, statute, fiat, ordinance, proclamation, enactment, dictum, pronouncement, ukase (rare), pronunciamento In 1741 Catherine the Great issued an edict of toleration for Buddhism.

edict

noun
1. A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
2. An authoritative or official decision, especially one made by a court:
Translations
مَرْسوم، مَنْشور
ediktvýnos
bekendtgørelseediktforordning
ediktijulistus
kormányrendelet
opinber tilskipun
edikts, lēmumslikums
dekrét

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] N (Hist) → edicto m (Jur) → decreto m, auto m (Pol) → decreto m; (by mayor) → bando m, edicto m

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] ndécret m

edict

nErlass m; (Hist) → Edikt nt

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] neditto

edict

(ˈiːdikt) noun
an order or command from someone in authority; a decree.
References in classic literature ?
Loving his country better than he did his disciple, the master had, by the Perpetual Edict, extinguished the hope which the young Prince might have entertained of one day becoming Stadtholder.
He lodged an information against Cornelius de Witt, setting forth that the warden -- who, as he had shown by the letters added to his signature, was fuming at the repeal of the Perpetual Edict -- had, from hatred against William of Orange, hired an assassin to deliver the new Republic of its new Stadtholder; and he, Tyckelaer was the person thus chosen; but that, horrified at the bare idea of the act which he was asked to perpetrate, he had preferred rather to reveal the crime than to commit it.
But after making six books about the adventures of those interesting but queer people who live in the Land of Oz, the Historian learned with sorrow that by an edict of the Supreme Ruler, Ozma of Oz, her country would thereafter be rendered invisible to all who lived outside its borders and that all communication with Oz would, in the future, be cut off.
Whereupon the emperor his father published an edict, commanding all his subjects, upon great penalties, to break the smaller end of their eggs.
He had petitioned the bishop for an edict which expressly forbade the Bohemian women to come and dance and beat their tambourines on the place of the Parvis; and for about the same length of time, he had been ransacking the mouldy placards of the officialty, in order to collect the cases of sorcerers and witches condemned to fire or the rope, for complicity in crimes with rams, sows, or goats.
An edict was issued requiring the examination of every child in England, for on the left breast of the little Prince was a birthmark which closely resembled a lily, and when after a year no child was found bearing such a mark and no trace of De Vac uncovered, the search was carried into France, nor was it ever wholly relinquished at any time for more than twenty years.
In defiance of conventual rules, and the edicts of popes and councils, the sleeves of this dignitary were lined and turned up with rich furs, his mantle secured at the throat with a golden clasp, and the whole dress proper to his order as much refined upon and ornamented, as that of a quaker beauty of the present day, who, while she retains the garb and costume of her sect continues to give to its simplicity, by the choice of materials and the mode of disposing them, a certain air of coquettish attraction, savouring but too much of the vanities of the world.
Who was he that did not know that knights-errant are independent of all jurisdictions, that their law is their sword, their charter their prowess, and their edicts their will?
After mass the young monarch drove to the Parliament House, where, upon the throne, he hastily confirmed not only such edicts as he had already passed, but issued new ones, each one, according to Cardinal de Retz, more ruinous than the others -- a proceeding which drew forth a strong remonstrance from the chief president, Mole -- whilst President Blancmesnil and Councillor Broussel raised their voices in indignation against fresh taxes.
The edict also stipulates that Article 15 regarding the inducement allowance shall be cancelled.
The edict comes after a chain of decisions that are new to the conservative kingdom.
The edict defines suspicious and abnormal activities as operations that are suspected to be linked, directly or indirectly, to crimes involving money-laundering and terror funding.