edict


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e·dict

 (ē′dĭkt′)
n.
1. A decree or proclamation issued by an authority and having the force of law.
2. A formal pronouncement or command.

[Latin ēdictum, from neuter past participle of ēdīcere, to declare : ē-, ex-, ex- + dīcere, to speak; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

edict

(ˈiːdɪkt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a decree, order, or ordinance issued by a sovereign, state, or any other holder of authority
2. any formal or authoritative command, proclamation, etc
[C15: from Latin ēdictum, from ēdīcere to declare]
eˈdictal adj
eˈdictally adv

e•dict

(ˈi dɪkt)

n.
1. a decree issued by a sovereign or other authority.
2. any authoritative proclamation or command.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin ēdictum, n. use of neuter of ēdictus, past participle of ēdīcere to decree, proclaim =ē- e- + dīcere to say]
e•dic′tal, adj.
e•dic′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.edict - a formal or authoritative proclamationedict - a formal or authoritative proclamation
announcement, proclamation, annunciation, declaration - a formal public statement; "the government made an announcement about changes in the drug war"; "a declaration of independence"
2.edict - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge)edict - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); "a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there"
act, enactment - a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body
consent decree - an agreement between two parties that is sanctioned by the court; for example, a company might agree to stop certain questionable practices without admitting guilt
curfew - an order that after a specific time certain activities (as being outside on the streets) are prohibited
decree nisi - a decree issued on a first petition for divorce; becomes absolute at some later date
imperial decree - a decree issued by a sovereign ruler
judicial separation, legal separation - a judicial decree regulating the rights and responsibilities of a married couple living apart
programma - an edict that has been publicly posted
ban, proscription, prohibition - a decree that prohibits something
stay - a judicial order forbidding some action until an event occurs or the order is lifted; "the Supreme Court has the power to stay an injunction pending an appeal to the whole Court"
papal bull, bull - a formal proclamation issued by the pope (usually written in antiquated characters and sealed with a leaden bulla)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

edict

noun decree, law, act, order, ruling, demand, command, regulation, dictate, mandate, canon, manifesto, injunction, statute, fiat, ordinance, proclamation, enactment, dictum, pronouncement, ukase (rare), pronunciamento In 1741 Catherine the Great issued an edict of toleration for Buddhism.

edict

noun
1. A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
2. An authoritative or official decision, especially one made by a court:
Translations
مَرْسوم، مَنْشور
ediktvýnos
bekendtgørelseediktforordning
ediktijulistus
kormányrendelet
opinber tilskipun
edikts, lēmumslikums
dekrét

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] N (Hist) → edicto m (Jur) → decreto m, auto m (Pol) → decreto m; (by mayor) → bando m, edicto m

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] ndécret m

edict

nErlass m; (Hist) → Edikt nt

edict

[ˈiːdɪkt] neditto

edict

(ˈiːdikt) noun
an order or command from someone in authority; a decree.
References in classic literature ?
But of my own knowledge, I know that down to the year sharks and shad, alewives and herring, against Linnaeus's express edict, were still found dividing the possession of the same seas with the Leviathan.
or can introduce Law and Edict on us, who without law Erre not, much less for this to be our Lord, And look for adoration to th' abuse Of those Imperial Titles which assert Our being ordain'd to govern, not to serve?
Whereupon the emperor his father published an edict, commanding all his subjects, upon great penalties, to break the smaller end of their eggs.
They had been the settlers of thirteen separate and distinct English colonies, along the margin of the shore of the North American Continent; contiguously situated, but chartered by adventurers of characters variously diversified, including sectarians, religious and political, of all the classes which for the two preceding centuries had agitated and divided the people of the British islands--and with them were intermingled the descendants of Hollanders, Swedes, Germans, and French fugitives from the persecution of the revoker of the Edict of Nantes.
was Her Majesty's edict as she looked down, with a lofty scorn that seemed curiously mixed with tender interest, on the ragged creature at her feet.
What need of bars, indeed, to keep those poor victims from rushing into the arena which the edict of the gods had appointed as their death place!
But, as I have remarked before, it is only a year or two ago that the ancient edict prohibiting Christian rubbish like ourselves to enter the Mosque of Omar and see the costly marbles that once adorned the inner Temple was annulled.
He went to Oreol and helped in the great matters then going on in the religious world; he signed an edict there, and I have seen a print of his signature; it struck me, so I copied it.
But after making six books about the adventures of those interesting but queer people who live in the Land of Oz, the Historian learned with sorrow that by an edict of the Supreme Ruler, Ozma of Oz, her country would thereafter be rendered invisible to all who lived outside its borders and that all communication with Oz would, in the future, be cut off.
An edict was issued requiring the examination of every child in England, for on the left breast of the little Prince was a birthmark which closely resembled a lily, and when after a year no child was found bearing such a mark and no trace of De Vac uncovered, the search was carried into France, nor was it ever wholly relinquished at any time for more than twenty years.
Loving his country better than he did his disciple, the master had, by the Perpetual Edict, extinguished the hope which the young Prince might have entertained of one day becoming Stadtholder.
It was the commander of a Chinese man-of-war who received a copy of the edict of 1972 from the hand of my illustrious ancestor, Admiral Turck, on one hundred seventy-five, two hundred and six years ago, and from the yellowed pages of the admiral's diary I learned that the fate of the Philippines was even then presaged by these Chinese naval officers.