edifice


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ed·i·fice

 (ĕd′ə-fĭs)
n.
1. A building, especially one of imposing appearance or size.
2. An elaborate conceptual structure: observations that provided the foundation for the edifice of evolutionary theory.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin aedificium, from aedificāre, to build : aedis, a building + -ficāre, -fy.]

edifice

(ˈɛdɪfɪs)
n
1. a building, esp a large or imposing one
2. a complex or elaborate institution or organization
[C14: from Old French, from Latin aedificium, from aedificāre to build; see edify]
edificial adj

ed•i•fice

(ˈɛd ə fɪs)

n.
1. a building, esp. a large or imposing one.
2. any large, complex system or organization.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Latin aedificium=aedific(āre) to build (see edify) + -ium -ium1]
ed`i•fi′cial (-ˈfɪʃ əl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one placeedifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
abattoir, butchery, slaughterhouse, shambles - a building where animals are butchered
annex, annexe, wing, extension - an addition that extends a main building
antechamber, anteroom, entrance hall, foyer, lobby, vestibule, hall - a large entrance or reception room or area
apartment building, apartment house - a building that is divided into apartments
architecture - an architectural product or work
aviary, bird sanctuary, volary - a building where birds are kept
bathhouse, bathing machine - a building containing dressing rooms for bathers
bowling alley - a building that contains several alleys for bowling
center, centre - a building dedicated to a particular activity; "they were raising money to build a new center for research"
chapterhouse - a building attached to a monastery or cathedral; used as a meeting place for the chapter
clubhouse, club - a building that is occupied by a social club; "the clubhouse needed a new roof"
quoin, corner - (architecture) solid exterior angle of a building; especially one formed by a cornerstone
nook, corner - an interior angle formed by two meeting walls; "a piano was in one corner of the room"
cornerstone - a stone at the outer corner of two intersecting masonry walls
cornerstone - a stone in the exterior of a large and important building; usually carved with a date and laid with appropriate ceremonies
courtyard, court - an area wholly or partly surrounded by walls or buildings; "the house was built around an inner court"
cullis - a gutter in a roof
dorm, dormitory, residence hall, student residence, hall - a college or university building containing living quarters for students
elevator, lift - lifting device consisting of a platform or cage that is raised and lowered mechanically in a vertical shaft in order to move people from one floor to another in a building
exterior door, outside door - a doorway that allows entrance to or exit from a building
farm building - a building on a farm
feedlot - a building where livestock are fattened for market
firetrap - a building that would be hard to escape from if it were to catch fire
storey, floor, story, level - a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
foundation stone - a stone laid at a ceremony to mark the founding of a new building
gambling den, gambling hell, gambling house, gaming house - a public building in which a variety of games of chance can be played (operated as a business)
gazebo, summerhouse - a small roofed building affording shade and rest
government building - a building that houses a branch of government
glasshouse, greenhouse, nursery - a building with glass walls and roof; for the cultivation and exhibition of plants under controlled conditions
hall - a large building for meetings or entertainment
hall - a large building used by a college or university for teaching or research; "halls of learning"
Hall of Fame - a building containing trophies honoring famous people
heating plant, heating system, heating, heat - utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating"
hotel - a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
casino-hotel, hotel-casino - a building that houses both a hotel and a casino
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
house - a building in which something is sheltered or located; "they had a large carriage house"
interior door - a door that closes off rooms within a building
library - a building that houses a collection of books and other materials
health facility, healthcare facility, medical building - building where medicine is practiced
ministry - building where the business of a government department is transacted
dead room, morgue, mortuary - a building (or room) where dead bodies are kept before burial or cremation
observatory - a building designed and equipped to observe astronomical phenomena

edifice

noun building, house, structure, construction, pile, erection, habitation a list of historical edifices she must not fail to visit

edifice

noun
A usually permanent construction, such as a house or store:
Translations
صَرْح، بِنايَه
bygningsværk
bygging
celtneēka
görkemli bina

edifice

[ˈedɪfɪs] N (frm) → edificio m (imponente)

edifice

[ˈɛdɪfɪs] nédifice m

edifice

n (lit, fig)Gebäude nt; (fig also)Gefüge nt

edifice

[ˈɛdɪfɪs] ncostruzione f, edificio

edifice

(ˈedifis) noun
a building. The new cathedral is a magnificent edifice.
References in classic literature ?
The roof of bark had long since fallen, and mingled with the soil, but the huge logs of pine, which had been hastily thrown together, still preserved their relative positions, though one angle of the work had given way under the pressure, and threatened a speedy downfall to the remainder of the rustic edifice.
On my occasional visits to the town aforesaid, I seldom failed to turn down Pyncheon Street, for the sake of passing through the shadow of these two antiquities, --the great elm-tree and the weather-beaten edifice.
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
We build our churches almost without regard to cost; we rear an edifice which is an adornment to the town, and we gild it, and fresco it, and mortgage it, and do everything we can think of to perfect it, and then spoil it all by putting a bell on it which afflicts everybody who hears it, giving some the headache, others St.
The church's high-backed, uncushioned pews would seat about three hundred persons; the edifice was but a small, plain affair, with a sort of pine board tree-box on top of it for a steeple.
In the roaring and raging of the conflagration, a red-hot wind, driving straight from the infernal regions, seemed to be blowing the edifice away.
Within the shadow, I may figuratively say, of that religious edifice immortalized by Chaucer, which was anciently the resort of Pilgrims from the remotest corners of - in short,' said Mr.
And for the Heav'ns wide Circuit, let it speak The Makers high magnificence, who built So spacious, and his Line stretcht out so farr; That Man may know he dwells not in his own; An Edifice too large for him to fill, Lodg'd in a small partition, and the rest Ordain'd for uses to his Lord best known.
The soft and gentle river Don sweeps through an amphitheatre, in which cultivation is richly blended with woodland, and on a mount, ascending from the river, well defended by walls and ditches, rises this ancient edifice, which, as its Saxon name implies, was, previous to the Conquest, a royal residence of the kings of England.
To any one understanding the architecture of the edifice, the Persian's action would seem to indicate that Erik's mysterious house had been built in the double case, formed of a thick wall constructed as an embankment or dam, then of a brick wall, a tremendous layer of cement and another wall several yards in thickness.
The fabric of the Declaration and that of the Confederation were each consistent with its own foundation, but they could not form one consistent, symmetrical edifice.
Each State, yielding to the persuasive voice of immediate interest or convenience, has successively withdrawn its support, till the frail and tottering edifice seems ready to fall upon our heads, and to crush us beneath its ruins.