edit


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Related to edit: EDT

ed·it

 (ĕd′ĭt)
tr.v. ed·it·ed, ed·it·ing, ed·its
1.
a. To prepare (written material) for publication or presentation, as by correcting, revising, or adapting.
b. To prepare an edition of for publication: edit a collection of short stories.
c. To modify or adapt so as to make suitable or acceptable: edited her remarks for presentation to a younger audience.
2. To supervise the publication of (a newspaper or magazine, for example).
3. To assemble the components of (a film or soundtrack, for example), as by cutting and splicing.
4. To eliminate; delete: edited the best scene out.
n.
An act or instance of editing: made several last-minute edits for reasons of space.
Phrasal Verbs:
edit in
To insert during the course of editing: An additional scene was edited in before the show was aired.
edit out
To delete during the course of editing: A controversial scene was edited out of the film.

[Partly back-formation from editor and partly from French éditer, to publish (from Latin ēditus, past participle of ēdere : ē-, ex-, ex- + dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots).]

edit

(ˈɛdɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Journalism & Publishing) to prepare (text) for publication by checking and improving its accuracy, clarity, etc
2. (Journalism & Publishing) to be in charge of (a publication, esp a periodical): he edits the local newspaper.
3. (Film) to prepare (a film, tape, etc) by rearrangement, selection, or rejection of previously filmed or taped material
4. (Computer Science) (tr) to modify (a computer file) by, for example, deleting, inserting, moving, or copying text
5. (Journalism & Publishing) (often foll by out) to remove (incorrect or unwanted matter), as from a manuscript or film
n
(Journalism & Publishing) informal an act of editing: give the book a final edit.
[C18: back formation from editor]

ed•it

(ˈɛd ɪt)

v.t.
1. to supervise or direct the preparation of (a publication); serve as editor of.
2. to collect, prepare, and arrange (materials) for publication.
3. to revise or correct, as a manuscript.
4. to delete; eliminate (often fol. by out): to edit out all references to his family.
5. to prepare (film, tape, etc.) by deleting, arranging, and splicing material.
6. to alter the arrangement of (genes).
7. to modify (computer data or text).
n.
8. an instance or the process of editing.
[1785–95; partly back formation from editor, partly < French éditer < Latin ēditus published]
ed′it•a•ble, adj.

edit.

1. edited.
2. edition.
3. editor.

edit

publish
1. 'edit'

If you edit a text, you examine it and make corrections to it so that it is suitable for publication.

I am indebted most particularly to Mrs Maria Jepps, who checked and edited the entire work.
2. 'publish'

Do not confuse edit with publish. When a company publishes a book or magazine, it prints copies of it, which are then sent to shops to be sold.

His latest book of poetry will be published by Faber in May.

edit


Past participle: edited
Gerund: editing

Imperative
edit
edit
Present
I edit
you edit
he/she/it edits
we edit
you edit
they edit
Preterite
I edited
you edited
he/she/it edited
we edited
you edited
they edited
Present Continuous
I am editing
you are editing
he/she/it is editing
we are editing
you are editing
they are editing
Present Perfect
I have edited
you have edited
he/she/it has edited
we have edited
you have edited
they have edited
Past Continuous
I was editing
you were editing
he/she/it was editing
we were editing
you were editing
they were editing
Past Perfect
I had edited
you had edited
he/she/it had edited
we had edited
you had edited
they had edited
Future
I will edit
you will edit
he/she/it will edit
we will edit
you will edit
they will edit
Future Perfect
I will have edited
you will have edited
he/she/it will have edited
we will have edited
you will have edited
they will have edited
Future Continuous
I will be editing
you will be editing
he/she/it will be editing
we will be editing
you will be editing
they will be editing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been editing
you have been editing
he/she/it has been editing
we have been editing
you have been editing
they have been editing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been editing
you will have been editing
he/she/it will have been editing
we will have been editing
you will have been editing
they will have been editing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been editing
you had been editing
he/she/it had been editing
we had been editing
you had been editing
they had been editing
Conditional
I would edit
you would edit
he/she/it would edit
we would edit
you would edit
they would edit
Past Conditional
I would have edited
you would have edited
he/she/it would have edited
we would have edited
you would have edited
they would have edited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.edit - prepare for publication or presentation by correcting, revising, or adapting; "Edit a book on lexical semantics"; "she edited the letters of the politician so as to omit the most personal passages"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
interpolate, alter, falsify - insert words into texts, often falsifying it thereby
cut up, hack - significantly cut up a manuscript
black out - suppress by censorship as for political reasons; "parts of the newspaper article were blacked out"
blank out - cut out, as for political reasons; "several line in the report were blanked out"
copyedit, copyread, subedit - edit and correct (written or printed material)
bracket out, bracket - place into brackets; "Please bracket this remark"
2.edit - supervise the publication of; "The same family has been editing the influential newspaper for almost 100 years"
issue, publish, bring out, release, put out - prepare and issue for public distribution or sale; "publish a magazine or newspaper"
3.edit - cut and assemble the components of; "edit film"; "cut recording tape"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
abbreviate, abridge, foreshorten, shorten, contract, reduce, cut - reduce in scope while retaining essential elements; "The manuscript must be shortened"
4.edit - cut or eliminate; "she edited the juiciest scenes"
censor - subject to political, religious, or moral censorship; "This magazine is censored by the government"

edit

verb
1. revise, check, improve, correct, polish, adapt, rewrite, censor, condense, annotate, rephrase, redraft, copy-edit, emend, prepare for publication, redact The publisher has the right to edit the book once it has been written.
2. put together, select, arrange, organize, assemble, compose, rearrange, reorder She has edited a collection of essays.
3. be in charge of, control, direct, be responsible for, be the editor of I used to edit the college paper in the old days.
edit something out remove, cut, exclude, omit, erase, excise, delete, strike out, expunge, blue-pencil This scene was edited out for television.
Quotations
"Editing is the same as quarreling with writers - same thing exactly" [Harold Ross]
Translations
editovat
redigere
parandus
نشر کردن
editoidamuokatamuokkausmuutosmuuttaa
sajtó alá rendezszerkeszt
búa til útgáfu; klippa; ritstÿra
edo
redaguotiredaktoriusvedamasis
rediģēt
editare
urejati
bearbetaredigera
yayına hazırlamak

edit

[ˈedɪt]
A. VT (= be in charge of) [+ newspaper, magazine, etc] → dirigir; (= prepare for printing) → corregir, revisar; (= cut) → cortar, reducir (Cine, TV) → montar (Rad) → editar (Comput) → editar
edited by [newspaper] → bajo la dirección de; [text, book] → edición de, editado por
B. Ncorrección f
C. CPD edit key Ntecla f de edición
edit out VT + ADVeliminar, suprimir

edit

[ˈɛdɪt] vt
[+ article, essay, manuscript] → préparer; [+ text written by sb else] → éditer
(COMPUTING) [+ file] → éditer
[editor] [+ magazine, newspaper] → être le rédacteur en chef de(la)/trice
[+ film] → monter
edit out
vt sep (= delete) → couper

edit

vt series, author, newspaper, magazineherausgeben, edieren; newspaper story, book, textredigieren, bearbeiten; film, tapeschneiden, cutten; (Comput) → editieren, bearbeiten; edited by: … (Film) → Schnitt: …

edit

[ˈɛdɪt] vt (newspaper, magazine) → dirigere; (book, series) → curare; (article, speech, text) → fare la revisione di; (tape, film) (TV) (programme) → montare (Comput) → editare, correggere e modificare
edit out vt + advtagliare

edit

(ˈedit) verb
to prepare (a book, manuscript, newspaper, programme, film etc) for publication, or for broadcasting etc, especially by correcting, altering, shortening etc.
edition (iˈdiʃn) noun
a number of copies of a book etc printed at a time, or the form in which they are produced. the third edition of the book; a paperback edition; the evening edition of the newspaper.
ˈeditor noun
1. a person who edits books etc. a dictionary editor.
2. a person who is in charge of (part of) a newspaper, journal etc. The editor of The Times; She has been appointed fashion editor.
ˌediˈtorial (-ˈtoː-) adjective
of or belonging to editors. editorial work/staff.
noun
the leading article in a newspaper.
References in classic literature ?
I use heaps of postage stamps, pay the expenses of many indifferent lecturers, defray the cost of printing reams of pamphlets and hand-bills which hail the laborer flatteringly as the salt of the earth, write and edit a little socialist journal, and do what lies in my power generally.
But as I do not know when I shall re-visit Tanglewood, and as Eustace Bright probably will not ask me to edit a third "WonderBook," the public of little folks must not expect to hear any more about those dear children from me.
They manage theaters, and promote swindles, and edit newspapers.
Lowell a paper on recent Italian comedy for the North American Review, which he and Professor Norton had then begun to edit.
My Aunt Jane helped edit a paper when she was at Queen's Academy, and she said it was very amusing and helped her a great deal.
The Edinburgh Review,' suggested and first conducted, in 1802, by the witty clergyman and reformer Sydney Smith, passed at once to the hands of Francis (later Lord) Jeffrey, a Scots lawyer who continued to edit it for nearly thirty years.