eerie


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ee·rie

or ee·ry  (îr′ē)
adj. ee·ri·er, ee·ri·est
1. Inspiring inexplicable fear, dread, or uneasiness; strange and frightening. See Synonyms at weird.
2. Scots Frightened or intimidated by superstition.

[Middle English eri, fearful, from Old English earg, cowardly.]

ee′ri·ly adv.
ee′ri·ness n.

eerie

or

eery

adj, eerier or eeriest
(esp of places, an atmosphere, etc) mysteriously or uncannily frightening or disturbing; weird; ghostly
[C13: originally Scottish and Northern English, probably from Old English earg cowardly, miserable]
ˈeerily adv
ˈeeriness n

ee•rie

or ee•ry

(ˈɪər i)

adj. -ri•er, -ri•est.
1. uncanny, so as to inspire superstitious fear; strange and mysterious: an eerie howl.
2. Chiefly Scot. affected with superstitious fear.
[1250–1300; Middle English eri, dial. variant of argh, Old English earg cowardly; c. Old Frisian erg, Old High German ar(a)g cowardly Old Norse argr evil]
ee′ri•ly, adv.
ee′ri•ness, n.
syn: See weird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eerie - suggestive of the supernatural; mysterious; "an eerie feeling of deja vu"
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"
2.eerie - inspiring a feeling of fear; strange and frightening; "an uncomfortable and eerie stillness in the woods"; "an eerie midnight howl"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"

eerie

adjective uncanny, strange, frightening, ghostly, weird, mysterious, scary (informal), sinister, uneasy, fearful, awesome, unearthly, supernatural, unnatural, spooky (informal), creepy (informal), spectral, eldritch (poetic), preternatural An eerie silence settled over the forest.

eerie

or eery
adjective
Of a mysteriously strange and usually frightening nature:
Informal: spooky.
Translations
مُخيف، غَريب
uhyggelig
outopelottava
óhugnanlegur
kraupiaikraupumasšiurpiaišiurpumasšiurpus
baismīgsdīvains
tajuplný
kuslig

eerie

[ˈɪərɪ] ADJ [sound, experience] → sobrecogedor, espeluznante; [silence] → estremecedor, inquietante, sobrecogedor

eerie

[ˈɪəri] adj [silence] → inquiétant(e); [feeling] → angoissant(e); [glow, sound] → sinistre

eerie

, eery
adj (+er)unheimlich

eerie

[ˈɪərɪ] adjsinistro/a, che fa accapponare la pelle

eerie

(ˈiəri) adjective
causing fear; weird. an eerie silence.
ˈeerily adverb
ˈeeriness noun
References in classic literature ?
As a rule when we play the wit at first flows free, but on this occasion I strode to the crease in an almost eerie silence.
Sometimes Leslie went to the lighthouse with them, and she and Anne wandered along the shore in the eerie twilight, or sat on the rocks below the lighthouse until the darkness drove them back to the cheer of the driftwood fire.
There was, to my mind, something eerie and ghost-like in the endless procession of faces which flitted across these narrow bars of light,--sad faces and glad, haggard and merry.
You've no idea what an eerie noise a great drop of rain falling with a mushy thud on a bare floor makes in the night.
From out of its black depths came the voice of a man singing in a cracked, eerie voice.
They will certainly be misled," Letton agreed, his eerie gray eyes blazing out from the voluminous folds of the huge Mueller with which he was swathing his neck to the ears.
It had been a day of wild November wind, closing down into a wet, eerie twilight.
Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevolent and fearful imps, Gulliver a most desolate wanderer in most dread and dangerous regions.
Roger laughs at me,' and there was a momentary bitterness in the little eerie face; 'but how can one live without hobbies?
For the moment they were feeling less eerie, because Tink was flying with them, and in her light they could distinguish each other.
Though written violently, it was in excellent English; but the editor, as usual, had given to somebody else the task of breaking it up into sub-headings, which were of a spicier sort, as "Peeress and Poisons", and "The Eerie Ear", "The Eyres in their Eyrie", and so on through a hundred happy changes.
He was a man of almost eerie versatility in this direction.