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Related to effects: Sound effects


1. Something brought about by a cause or agent; a result.
2. The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result: The government's action had little effect on the trade imbalance.
3. Advantage; avail: used her words to great effect in influencing the jury.
4. The condition of being in full force or execution; operativeness: a new regulation that goes into effect tomorrow.
a. Something that produces a specific impression or supports a general design or intention: The lighting effects emphasized the harsh atmosphere of the drama.
b. A particular impression: large windows that gave an effect of spaciousness.
c. Production of a desired impression: spent lavishly on dinner just for effect.
6. The basic or general meaning; import: He said he was greatly worried, or words to that effect.
7. effects Movable belongings; goods.
tr.v. ef·fect·ed, ef·fect·ing, ef·fects
To bring about; make happen; cause or accomplish: effect a cure for a disease; effect a change in policy. See Usage Note at affect1.
in effect
In essence; to all purposes: testimony that in effect contradicted her earlier statement.
to the effect that
With the general meaning that: He said something to the effect that he was sorry.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin effectus, from past participle of efficere, to accomplish : ex-, ex- + facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ef·fect′er n.
ef·fect′i·ble adj.
Synonyms: effect, consequence, result, outcome, upshot
These nouns denote an occurrence, situation, or condition that is produced by a cause or agent. Effect stresses the idea of influence or alteration: a drug whose main effect is to lower hypertension; increased erosion that was the effect of deforestation.
A consequence follows naturally or logically from its cause: a broken wrist that was the consequence of a fall; a reduction in crime that was the consequence of better policing.
A result is viewed as the end product of the operation of the cause: improved his grades as a result of better study habits; an experiment with an unexpected result.
An outcome more strongly implies finality and may suggest the resolution of a complex or lengthy process: The trial's outcome might have changed if the defendant had testified.
An upshot is a decisive result, often of the nature of a climax: "The upshot of the matter ... was that she showed both of them the door" (Robert Louis Stevenson).


pl n
1. Also called: personal effects personal property or belongings
2. (Theatre) lighting, sounds, etc, to accompany and enhance a stage, film, or broadcast production



1. goods; movables; personal property.
syn: See property.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.effects - property of a personal character that is portable but not used in business; "she left some of her personal effects in the house"; "I watched over their effects until they returned"
personal estate, personal property, personalty, private property - movable property (as distinguished from real estate)
مُؤَثِّراتمُمْتَلَكات، أمْتِعَه
persónulegar eigurtækni
efektetmenlerkişisel eşya


[ɪˈfɛkts] npl
(in film)effets mpl
(= property) → effets mpl, affaires fpl


[ɪˈfɛkts] npl
a. (Cine, Theatre) (visual) → effetti mpl scenici; (sound) → effetti mpl sonori
b. (property) → effetti mpl


(iˈfekt) noun
1. a result or consequence. He is suffering from the effects of over-eating; His discovery had little effect at first.
2. an impression given or produced. The speech did not have much effect (on them); a pleasing effect.
to make happen; to bring about. He tried to effect a reconciliation between his parents.
efˈfective (-tiv) adjective
1. having power to produce, or producing, a desired result. These new teaching methods have proved very effective.
2. striking or pleasing. an effective display of flowers.
3. in operation; working; active. The new law becomes effective next week.
efˈfectively (-tivli) adverb
efˈfects noun plural
1. property; goods. She left few personal effects when she died.
2. in drama etc, devices for producing suitable sounds, lighting etc to accompany a play etc. sound effects.
efˈfectual (-tʃuəl) adjective
successful in producing the desired results. He was not very effectual as an organiser.
come into effect
(of a law etc) to begin to operate. The law came into effect last month.
for effect
for the sake of making an impression. You don't mean that – you only said it for effect.
in effect
1. (of a rule etc) in operation. That law is no longer in effect.
2. in truth or in practical terms. In effect our opinions differed very little.
put into effect
to put (a law etc) into operation. He has begun to put his theories into effect.
take effect
to begin to work; to come into force. When will the drug take effect?
References in classic literature ?
Finding the child more docile and amiable than her sister, the old lady felt it her duty to try and counteract, as far as possible, the bad effects of home freedom and indulgence.
Curtis Hartman came near dying from the effects of that night of waiting in the church, and also he found in the thing that happened what he took to be the way of life for him.
I should like to get some photographs to accompany an article that perhaps I shall write on the effects of sudden and severe tropical storms.
The Hurons are not to be seen," he said, addressing David, who had by no means recovered from the effects of the stunning blow he had received; "let us conceal ourselves in the cavern, and trust the rest to Providence.
Kearney," she said dryly, "one would think that some silly, conceited girl"--she was quite earnest in her epithets, for a sudden, angry conviction of some coquetry and disingenuousness in Jessie had come to her in contemplating its effects upon the young fellow at her side--"some country jilt, had been trying her rustic hand upon you.
As one of its effects, it bestowed on his countenance a quicker mobility than the old Englishman's had possessed, and keener vivacity, but at the expense of a sturdier something, on which these acute endowments seemed to act like dissolving acids.
In some other form, perhaps, I may hereafter develop these effects.
With these he lived successively a week at a time, thus going the rounds of the neighborhood, with all his worldly effects tied up in a cotton handkerchief.
However, I had never been in the South Seas; and perhaps the sun there produced these extraordinary effects upon the skin.
As it was, three of the oarsmen --who foreknew not the precise instant of the dart, and were therefore unprepared for its effects -- these were flung out; but so fell, that, in an instant two of them clutched the gunwale again, and rising to its level on a combing wave, hurled themselves bodily inboard again; the third man helplessly dropping astern, but still afloat and swimming.
The men upon the killing beds felt also the effects of the slump which had turned Marija out; but they felt it in a different way, and a way which made Jurgis understand at last all their bitterness.
Many of the men sprang forward, officiously, to offer their services, either from the hope of the reward, or from that cringing subserviency which is one of the most baleful effects of slavery.