effects


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to effects: Sound effects

ef·fect

 (ĭ-fĕkt′)
n.
1. Something brought about by a cause or agent; a result.
2. The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result: The government's action had little effect on the trade imbalance.
3. Advantage; avail: used her words to great effect in influencing the jury.
4. The condition of being in full force or execution; operativeness: a new regulation that goes into effect tomorrow.
5.
a. Something that produces a specific impression or supports a general design or intention: The lighting effects emphasized the harsh atmosphere of the drama.
b. A particular impression: large windows that gave an effect of spaciousness.
c. Production of a desired impression: spent lavishly on dinner just for effect.
6. The basic or general meaning; import: He said he was greatly worried, or words to that effect.
7. effects Movable belongings; goods.
tr.v. ef·fect·ed, ef·fect·ing, ef·fects
To bring about; make happen; cause or accomplish: effect a cure for a disease; effect a change in policy. See Usage Note at affect1.
Idioms:
in effect
In essence; to all purposes: testimony that in effect contradicted her earlier statement.
to the effect that
With the general meaning that: He said something to the effect that he was sorry.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin effectus, from past participle of efficere, to accomplish : ex-, ex- + facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ef·fect′er n.
ef·fect′i·ble adj.
Synonyms: effect, consequence, result, outcome, upshot
These nouns denote an occurrence, situation, or condition that is produced by a cause or agent. Effect stresses the idea of influence or alteration: a drug whose main effect is to lower hypertension; increased erosion that was the effect of deforestation.
A consequence follows naturally or logically from its cause: a broken wrist that was the consequence of a fall; a reduction in crime that was the consequence of better policing.
A result is viewed as the end product of the operation of the cause: improved his grades as a result of better study habits; an experiment with an unexpected result.
An outcome more strongly implies finality and may suggest the resolution of a complex or lengthy process: The trial's outcome might have changed if the defendant had testified.
An upshot is a decisive result, often of the nature of a climax: "The upshot of the matter ... was that she showed both of them the door" (Robert Louis Stevenson).

effects

(ɪˈfɛkts)
pl n
1. Also called: personal effects personal property or belongings
2. (Theatre) lighting, sounds, etc, to accompany and enhance a stage, film, or broadcast production

ef•fects

(ɪˈfɛkts)

n.pl.
1. goods; movables; personal property.
[1700–10]
syn: See property.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.effects - property of a personal character that is portable but not used in business; "she left some of her personal effects in the house"; "I watched over their effects until they returned"
personal estate, personal property, personalty, private property - movable property (as distinguished from real estate)
Translations
مُؤَثِّراتمُمْتَلَكات، أمْتِعَه
=-effekteffektejendel
effektekhangkulisszaingóságok
persónulegar eigurtækni
efekty
efektetmenlerkişisel eşya

effects

[ɪˈfɛkts] npl
(in film)effets mpl
(= property) → effets mpl, affaires fpl

effects

[ɪˈfɛkts] npl
a. (Cine, Theatre) (visual) → effetti mpl scenici; (sound) → effetti mpl sonori
b. (property) → effetti mpl

effect

(iˈfekt) noun
1. a result or consequence. He is suffering from the effects of over-eating; His discovery had little effect at first.
2. an impression given or produced. The speech did not have much effect (on them); a pleasing effect.
verb
to make happen; to bring about. He tried to effect a reconciliation between his parents.
efˈfective (-tiv) adjective
1. having power to produce, or producing, a desired result. These new teaching methods have proved very effective.
2. striking or pleasing. an effective display of flowers.
3. in operation; working; active. The new law becomes effective next week.
efˈfectively (-tivli) adverb
efˈfects noun plural
1. property; goods. She left few personal effects when she died.
2. in drama etc, devices for producing suitable sounds, lighting etc to accompany a play etc. sound effects.
efˈfectual (-tʃuəl) adjective
successful in producing the desired results. He was not very effectual as an organiser.
come into effect
(of a law etc) to begin to operate. The law came into effect last month.
for effect
for the sake of making an impression. You don't mean that – you only said it for effect.
in effect
1. (of a rule etc) in operation. That law is no longer in effect.
2. in truth or in practical terms. In effect our opinions differed very little.
put into effect
to put (a law etc) into operation. He has begun to put his theories into effect.
take effect
to begin to work; to come into force. When will the drug take effect?
References in classic literature ?
This exclusion, whether temporary or perpetual, would have nearly the same effects, and these effects would be for the most part rather pernicious than salutary.
As for the observation that Machiavel hath, that the jealousy of sects, doth much extinguish the memory of things; traducing Gregory the Great, that he did what in him lay, to extinguish all heathen antiquities; I do not find that those zeals do any great effects, nor last long; as it appeared in the succession of Sabinian, who did revive the former antiquities.
These must be chiefly, if not wholly, effects of the unsteadiness and injustice with which a factious spirit has tainted our public administrations.
Besides, the production of spectacular effects depends more on the art of the stage machinist than on that of the poet.
But they are not explained, unless with extreme artificiality, by any theory which regards the latent effects of experience as psychical rather than physical.
I showed myself a little concerned and uneasy at this account, and inquired of the old captain how it came to pass that the trustees should thus dispose of my effects, when he knew that I had made my will, and had made him, the Portuguese captain, my universal heir,
But in Poetry, as the literature especially characterized in general by high Emotion, Imagination, and Beauty, finer and more delicate effects are to be sought than in Prose.
Causes of Variability -- Effects of Habit -- Correlation of Growth -- Inheritance -- Character of Domestic Varieties -- Difficulty of distinguishing between Varieties and Species -- Origin of Domestic Varieties from one or more Species -- Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin -- Principle of Selection anciently followed, its Effects -- Methodical and Unconscious Selection -- Unknown Origin of our Domestic Productions -- Circumstances favourable to Man's power of Selection.
In front of us there was an extensive brake of wild sugar-cane; and the stream was shaded by the dark green knotted stem of the Ava, -- so famous in former days for its powerful intoxicating effects.
Mat treated the objection with great contempt, and averred in reply, that he made the slaves black in order to obtain a striking effect of contrast, and that, could he have derived a similar advantage from making his heroine blue, blue she should have been.
The clever combatant looks to the effect of combined energy, and does not require too much from individuals.
He had the effect of taking me into the great world, and making me a party to his splendid indifference to titles, and even to royalties; and I could not see that sham for sham he was unwittingly the greatest sham of all.