effeminately


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ef·fem·i·nate

 (ĭ-fĕm′ə-nĭt)
adj.
Having or showing qualities or characteristics more often associated with females than males; unmanly: "gentle, kind, effeminate remorse" (Shakespeare).

[Middle English effeminat, from Latin effēminātus, past participle of effēmināre, to make feminine : ex-, ex- + fēmina, woman; see dhē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

ef·fem′i·na·cy (-nə-sē), ef·fem′i·nate·ness n.
ef·fem′i·nate n.
ef·fem′i·nate·ly adv.
Translations
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References in classic literature ?
His feet were effeminately small, and were clad in buff-coloured silk stockings, and little womanish bronze-leather slippers.
Gay male characters, such as Howard in Harvest Moon: A Tale of Two Towns and Marian in Story of Seasons, are also often shown as enjoying gender non-conforming activities or performing their gender effeminately.
Male grooming's supposed ability to establish manliness and its emasculating effects remain in quizzical tension: no matter how manly the man who bears his whiskers, overtly paying attention to them betokens an affectation that borders on the effeminately dandyish.
Thus, the first identity offered Haemon, the one characterized effeminately (and compared through allusion with Ismene), is described as if he arrives in reaction to a democratic decision, as a citizen.
If a man were to wear effeminate clothing or were to walk or speak effeminately, he may have had a claim.
The male shaman is temporarily inhabited by a female spirit and acts out the feminine aspects of his personality by behaving effeminately.
To wit, after Kint is picked up outside the police station by his foreign and dandified associate, the man known as Kobayashi (Pete Posthelwaite) in his testimony, Kint smokes a cigarette effeminately.
She really is a 'one'," I tutted, a tad effeminately.
Coales reportedly caused outrage after she suggested that if gay junior doctors deepened their voices and behaved effeminately around patients, they would stand a better chance of impressing their examiners.
The Spaniards identified these "young men in women's apparel, smooth and effeminately decked" as sexual tools and accused the new king of having "abused with preposterous Venus.
The appearance of Surenas - dressed effeminately (in Roman eyes), wearing make-up and with his hair parted like a women - prompted Crassus to ridicule him openly and call him a catamite.
At one point, the man effeminately skips, his arms flying out to possess space, a bold gesture of the right to existence, to joy and exuberance, pure means without ends.