effusion


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Related to effusion: pleural effusion, Pericardial effusion

ef·fu·sion

 (ĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of effusing.
b. Liquid or other matter poured forth.
2. An unrestrained outpouring of feeling, as in speech or writing: "the devout effusions of sacred eloquence" (Edmund Burke).
3. Medicine
a. The seeping of serous, purulent, or bloody fluid into a body cavity or tissue.
b. The effused fluid.

effusion

(ɪˈfjuːʒən)
n
1. an unrestrained outpouring in speech or words
2. the act or process of being poured out
3. something that is poured out
4. (General Physics) the flow of a gas through a small aperture under pressure, esp when the density is such that the mean distance between molecules is large compared to the diameter of the aperture
5. (Medicine) med
a. the escape of blood or other fluid into a body cavity or tissue
b. the fluid that has escaped

ef•fu•sion

(ɪˈfyu ʒən)

n.
1. the act of effusing or pouring forth.
2. something that is effused.
3. an unrestrained expression, as of feelings.
4.
a. the escape of a fluid, as blood, from its natural vessels into a body cavity.
b. the fluid that escapes.
5. the flow of a gas with a mean distance between molecules that is large compared to the diameter of the orifice through which it flows.
[1350–1400; < Latin]

effusion

The process by which a gas under pressure moves through a small aperture into an region of lower pressure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.effusion - an unrestrained expression of emotion
expression, reflexion, reflection, manifestation - expression without words; "tears are an expression of grief"; "the pulse is a reflection of the heart's condition"
acting out - a (usually irritating) impulsive and uncontrollable outburst by a problem child or a neurotic adult
cry - a fit of weeping; "had a good cry"
explosion - a sudden outburst; "an explosion of laughter"; "an explosion of rage"
flare - a sudden outburst of emotion; "she felt a flare of delight"; "she could not control her flare of rage"
2.effusion - flow under pressure
overflow, flood, outpouring - a large flow
Translations

effusion

[ɪˈfjuːʒən] Nefusión f

effusion

n (lit, fig)Erguss m

effusion

[ɪˈfjuːʒn] neffusione f

ef·fu·sion

n. efusión, derrame, escape de líquido a una cavidad o tejido;
pericardial ______ pericardial;
pleural ______ pleural.

effusion

n derrame m; pericardial — derrame pericárdico; pleural — derrame pleural
References in classic literature ?
Amy's face was a study when she saw her sister skim into the next drawing room, kiss all the young ladies with effusion, beam graciously upon the young gentlemen, and join in the chat with a spirit which amazed the beholder.
Higginson, and the outpouring of a psalm from the general throat of the community, was to be made acceptable to the grosser sense by ale, cider, wine, and brandy, in copious effusion, and, as some authorities aver, by an ox, roasted whole, or at least, by the weight and substance of an ox, in more manageable joints and sirloins.
But then, what reams of other manuscripts -- filled, not with the dulness of official formalities, but with the thought of inventive brains and the rich effusion of deep hearts -- had gone equally to oblivion; and that, moreover, without serving a purpose in their day, as these heaped-up papers had, and -- saddest of all -- without purchasing for their writers the comfortable livelihood which the clerks of the Custom-House had gained by these worthless scratchings of the pen.
He thanked me with effusion, and said that putting the thing in this form removed every objection.
The prize was delivered to Tom with as much effusion as the superintendent could pump up under the circumstances; but it lacked somewhat of the true gush, for the poor fellow's instinct taught him that there was a mystery here that could not well bear the light, perhaps; it was simply preposterous that this boy had warehoused two thousand sheaves of Scriptural wisdom on his premises -- a dozen would strain his capacity, without a doubt.
Elton, though hesitating a good deal while he spoke; "I have no hesitation in sayingat least if my friend feels at all as I doI have not the smallest doubt that, could he see his little effusion honoured as I see it,
I was not free to resume the interrupted chain of my reflections till bedtime: even then a teacher who occupied the same room with me kept me from the subject to which I longed to recur, by a prolonged effusion of small talk.
Hee in Celestial Panoplie all armd Of radiant URIM, work divinely wrought, Ascended, at his right hand Victorie Sate Eagle-wing'd, beside him hung his Bow And Quiver with three-bolted Thunder stor'd, And from about him fierce Effusion rowld Of smoak and bickering flame, and sparkles dire; Attended with ten thousand thousand Saints, He onward came, farr off his coming shon, And twentie thousand (I thir number heard) Chariots of God, half on each hand were seen: Hee on the wings of Cherub rode sublime On the Crystallin Skie, in Saphir Thron'd.
The combat was to cease as soon as Prince John should throw down his leading staff, or truncheon; another precaution usually taken to prevent the unnecessary effusion of blood by the too long endurance of a sport so desperate.
It so happened that the chief of the Blackfeet party was a renegade from the Nez Perces; unlike Kosato, however, he had no vindictive rage against his native tribe, but was rather disposed, now he had got the booty, to spare all unnecessary effusion of blood.
The total loss of the victors in this obstinately contested affair was, in killed, wounded, and missing--one forefinger and part of a thumb-nail (which the late proprietor brought along with him in his hand), a severely contused arm, and a considerable effusion of blood flowing from the thigh of a chief, who had received an ugly thrust from a Happar spear.
When the violence of the steward’s feelings had in some measure subsided, he turned to his fellow- sufferer, and, with a motive that might have vindicated a worse effusion, he attempted the charitable office of consolation,