ego ideal


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ego ideal

n.
In psychoanalysis, the part of one's ego that contains an idealized self based on those people, especially parents and peers, one admires and wishes to emulate.

ego ideal

n
(Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an internal ideal of personal perfection that represents what one wants to be rather than what one ought to be and is derived from one's early relationship with one's parents. See also superego

e′go ide`al


n.
Psychoanal. an ideal of personal excellence based on positive identification with parent figures.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ego ideal - (psychoanalysis) the part of the ego that contains an ideal of personal excellence toward which a person strives
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
ideal - the idea of something that is perfect; something that one hopes to attain
References in periodicals archive ?
27) We can add to Valente's reading by saying that, in Freudian terms, the prefect's hands are signifiers of Stephen's ego ideal at work.
The closer we all get to living a life that is in sync with our ego ideal, the more fulfilled we will be, he said.
For his part, Bill Cosey understands both that his father is not to be imitated as ego ideal, since there is something obscenely evil in this role, and, to the extent that it ever can be achieved deliberately, that he ought to construct a "self" in opposition to Dark.
The imaginary subject of the mirror stage is likewise framed in the symbolic by means of the unary trait, the ego ideal that identifies the form in the mirror, the ideal ego, as a subject for the Other; the proper name as the trace or metonym of the subject is 'a model for the unary trait' that constitutes 'a subject-as-meaning, despite the fact the name itself is meaningless' (55).
Freud discussed "a differentiation in the ego" as the ego ideal or superego, thus introducing the now familiar term but not as yet clearly distinguished from the ego ideal.