egoism


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Related to egoism: utilitarianism

e·go·ism

 (ē′gō-ĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The doctrine that human behavior is motivated by self-interest.
b. The belief that self-interest provides the proper basis for moral behavior.
2. Egotism; conceit. See Synonyms at conceit.

egoism

(ˈiːɡəʊˌɪzəm; ˈɛɡ-)
n
1. concern for one's own interests and welfare
2. (Philosophy) ethics the theory that the pursuit of one's own welfare is the highest good. Compare altruism
3. self-centredness; egotism

e•go•ism

(ˈi goʊˌɪz əm, ˈɛg oʊ-)

n.
1. the habit of valuing everything only in reference to one's personal interest (opposed to altruism).
2. egotism or conceit.
3. the view in ethics that morality ultimately rests on self-interest.
[1775–85; < French égoïsme]
e`go•is′tic, e′go•is′ti•cal, adj.
e`go•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See egotism.

egoism

an extreme individualism; thought and behavior based upon the premise that one’s individual self is the highest product, if not the totality, of existence. Cf. individualism. — egoist, n. — egoistic, adj.
See also: Self
an extreme individualism; thought and behavior based upon the premise that one’s individual self is the highest product, if not the totality, of existence. Cf. individualism.egoist, n.egoistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.egoism - (ethics) the theory that the pursuit of your own welfare in the basis of morality
theory - a belief that can guide behavior; "the architect has a theory that more is less"; "they killed him on the theory that dead men tell no tales"
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
2.egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
altruism, selflessness - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others

egoism

noun
2. An exaggerated belief in one's own importance:
3. A regarding of oneself with undue favor:
Slang: ego trip.
Translations
أنانِيَّه
egoismeselvoptagethed
egoizam
egoizmus
sjálfselska, eigingirni
利己主義
egoism
bencillikegoizm

egoism

[ˈegəʊɪzəm] Negoísmo m

egoism

[ˈiːgəʊɪzəm ˈɛgəʊɪzəm] négoïsme m

egoism

nEgoismus m, → Selbstsucht f

egoism

[ˈɛgəʊɪzm] negoismo

ego

(ˈiːgəu) , (ˈegou) noun
1. personal pride. His criticism wounded my ego.
2. the part of a person that is conscious and thinks; the self.
egocentric (egəˈsentrik) , ((American) i:gou-) adjective
interested in oneself only.
ˈegoism (ˈe-) , ((American) i:-) noun
selfishness.
ˈegoist (ˈe-) , ((American) ˈi:-) noun
ˌegoˈistic, egoˈistical adjective

egoism

n. egoísmo.

egoism

n egoísmo
References in classic literature ?
If this be an ordered selfishness, then we should pause before we condemn any one for the vice of egoism, for there may be deeper root for its causes than we have knowledge of.
There were not lacking, however, evidences of what we may call the intelligent egoism of a youth who is charmed with the indolent, careless life of an only son, and who lives as it were in a gilded cage.
Deeds of kindness were as easy to him as a bad habit: they were the common issue of his weaknesses and good qualities, of his egoism and his sympathy.
But this superadded consciousness, wearying and annoying enough when it urged on me the trivial experience of indifferent people, became an intense pain and grief when it seemed to be opening to me the souls of those who were in a close relation to me--when the rational talk, the graceful attentions, the wittily-turned phrases, and the kindly deeds, which used to make the web of their characters, were seen as if thrust asunder by a microscopic vision, that showed all the intermediate frivolities, all the suppressed egoism, all the struggling chaos of puerilities, meanness, vague capricious memories, and indolent make-shift thoughts, from which human words and deeds emerge like leaflets covering a fermenting heap.
It gave one a glimpse of amazing egoism in a sentiment to which one could hardly give a name, a mysterious appropriation of one human being by another as if in defiance of unexpressed things and for an unheard-of satisfaction of an inconceivable pride.
It was mere vain egoism, and it was moreover, if she liked, a morbid obsession.
But his egoism was not even skin-deep; it was rather a cloak, which Raffles could cast off quicker than any man I ever knew, as he did not fail to show me now.
Cadwallader was a large man, with full lips and a sweet smile; very plain and rough in his exterior, but with that solid imperturbable ease and good-humor which is infectious, and like great grassy hills in the sunshine, quiets even an irritated egoism, and makes it rather ashamed of itself.
As a man advances in life he grows more selfish; egoism develops, and relaxes all the secondary bonds of affection.
Thereupon, with characteristic egoism, Milton put forth a series of pamphlets on divorce, arguing, contrary to English law, and with great scandal to the public, that mere incompatibility of temper was adequate ground for separation.
Ideas can never utterly perish, so these beliefs linger on in our midst, but they do not influence the great mass of the people, and Society has no support but Egoism.
Fyne brushed them aside, with the semi-conscious egoism of all safe, established, existences.