eject


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e·ject

 (ĭ-jĕkt′)
v. e·ject·ed, e·ject·ing, e·jects
v.tr.
1. To throw out forcefully; expel: The burning house ejected yellow flames into the night sky.
2.
a. To compel to leave: ejected the bar patron who started a fight.
b. To evict: ejected tenants for lease violations.
3. Sports To disqualify or force (a player or coach) to leave the playing area for the remainder of a game.
4.
a. To cause a device to push (something) out: I ejected the DVD from the player using the remote control.
b. To push (something) out: The console ejected the video game.
v.intr.
To make an emergency exit from an aircraft by deployment of an ejection seat or capsule.

[Middle English ejecten, from Latin ēicere, ēiect- : ē-, ex-, ex- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

e·ject′a·ble adj.

eject

(ɪˈdʒɛkt)
vb
1. (tr) to drive or force out; expel or emit
2. (tr) to compel (a person) to leave; evict; dispossess
3. (tr) to dismiss, as from office
4. (Aeronautics) (intr) to leave an aircraft rapidly, using an ejection seat or capsule
5. (Psychiatry) (tr) psychiatry to attribute (one's own motivations and characteristics) to others
[C15: from Latin ejicere, from jacere to throw]
eˈjection n

e•ject

(ɪˈdʒɛkt)

v.t.
1. to drive or force out; expel.
2. to dismiss, as from office.
3. to evict.
4. to throw out or throw off.
v.i.
5. to propel oneself from a disabled airplane, esp. by an ejection seat.
[1545–55; < Latin ējectus, past participle of ēicere to throw out]
e•ject′a•ble, adj.
e•jec′tion, n.

eject


Past participle: ejected
Gerund: ejecting

Imperative
eject
eject
Present
I eject
you eject
he/she/it ejects
we eject
you eject
they eject
Preterite
I ejected
you ejected
he/she/it ejected
we ejected
you ejected
they ejected
Present Continuous
I am ejecting
you are ejecting
he/she/it is ejecting
we are ejecting
you are ejecting
they are ejecting
Present Perfect
I have ejected
you have ejected
he/she/it has ejected
we have ejected
you have ejected
they have ejected
Past Continuous
I was ejecting
you were ejecting
he/she/it was ejecting
we were ejecting
you were ejecting
they were ejecting
Past Perfect
I had ejected
you had ejected
he/she/it had ejected
we had ejected
you had ejected
they had ejected
Future
I will eject
you will eject
he/she/it will eject
we will eject
you will eject
they will eject
Future Perfect
I will have ejected
you will have ejected
he/she/it will have ejected
we will have ejected
you will have ejected
they will have ejected
Future Continuous
I will be ejecting
you will be ejecting
he/she/it will be ejecting
we will be ejecting
you will be ejecting
they will be ejecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ejecting
you have been ejecting
he/she/it has been ejecting
we have been ejecting
you have been ejecting
they have been ejecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ejecting
you will have been ejecting
he/she/it will have been ejecting
we will have been ejecting
you will have been ejecting
they will have been ejecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ejecting
you had been ejecting
he/she/it had been ejecting
we had been ejecting
you had been ejecting
they had been ejecting
Conditional
I would eject
you would eject
he/she/it would eject
we would eject
you would eject
they would eject
Past Conditional
I would have ejected
you would have ejected
he/she/it would have ejected
we would have ejected
you would have ejected
they would have ejected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.eject - put out or expel from a placeeject - put out or expel from a place; "The unruly student was excluded from the game"
evict, force out - expel from one's property or force to move out by a legal process; "The landlord evicted the tenants after they had not paid the rent for four months"
evict - expel or eject without recourse to legal process; "The landlord wanted to evict the tenants so he banged on the pipes every morning at 3 a.m."
show the door - ask to leave; "I was shown the door when I asked for a raise"
bounce - eject from the premises; "The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club"
exorcise, exorcize - expel through adjuration or prayers; "exorcise evil spirits"
expel, kick out, throw out - force to leave or move out; "He was expelled from his native country"
2.eject - eliminate (a substance); "combustion products are exhausted in the engine"; "the plant releases a gas"
cough out, cough up, expectorate, spit up, spit out - discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
blow - free of obstruction by blowing air through; "blow one's nose"
ejaculate - eject semen
abort - terminate a pregnancy by undergoing an abortion
ovulate - produce and discharge eggs; "women ovulate about once every month"
egest, excrete, eliminate, pass - eliminate from the body; "Pass a kidney stone"
bleed, hemorrhage, shed blood - lose blood from one's body
eruct, spew out, spew - eject or send out in large quantities, also metaphorical; "the volcano spews out molten rocks every day"; "The editors of the paper spew out hostile articles about the Presidential candidate"
fester, suppurate, maturate - ripen and generate pus; "her wounds are festering"
emit, pass off, breathe - expel (gases or odors)
3.eject - leave an aircraft rapidly, using an ejection seat or capsule
exit, get out, go out, leave - move out of or depart from; "leave the room"; "the fugitive has left the country"
4.eject - cause to come out in a squirt; "the boy squirted water at his little sister"
spritz - eject (a liquid) quickly; "spritz water on a surface"
extravasate - force out or cause to escape from a proper vessel or channel
discharge - pour forth or release; "discharge liquids"

eject

verb
1. throw out, remove, turn out, expel (slang), exile, oust, banish, deport, drive out, evict, boot out (informal), force to leave, chuck out (informal), bounce, turf out (informal), give the bum's rush (slang), show someone the door, throw someone out on their ear (informal) He was forcibly ejected from the restaurant.
2. dismiss, sack (informal), fire (informal), remove, get rid of, discharge, expel, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), give someone their P45 (informal) He was ejected from his first job for persistent latecoming.
3. discharge, expel, emit, give off He fired a single shot, then ejected the spent cartridge.
4. bail out, escape, get out The pilot ejected from the plane and escaped injury.

eject

verb
1. To send forth (confined matter) violently:
Geology: extravasate.
2. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
3. To catapult oneself from a disabled aircraft:
Translations
يُخْرِج، يَطْرُديَقْذِفُ من الطّائِرَه
bortvisesmide ud
häätääpoistaa
katapultál
reka/henda/bera útskjóta sér út
išmetimaskatapultavimasiskatapultuotis
izdzītizliktkatapultēties
atlamakatmakfırlamak

eject

[ɪˈdʒekt]
A. VT (Aer, Tech) [+ bomb, flames] → expulsar; [+ cartridge] → expulsar, eyectar; [+ troublemaker] → echar; [+ tenant] → desahuciar
B. VI [pilot] → eyectarse

eject

[ɪˈdʒɛkt]
vt
(= force to leave) [+ person] → expulser
to eject sb from → expulser qn de
(= remove) [+ part, cartridge] → éjecter
to eject sth into (= throw) → projeter qch dans
vi [pilot] → s'éjecter
to eject from a plane → s'éjecter d'un avion

eject

vt
(= throw out) heckler, tenanthinauswerfen
cartridgeauswerfen; (Tech) → ausstoßen, auswerfen; pilotherausschleudern
vi (pilot)den Schleudersitz betätigen

eject

[ɪˈdʒɛkt]
1. vt (Tech) → sganciare, eiettare; (flames) → emettere; (cartridge) → espellere; (troublemaker) → espellere, allontanare
2. vi (pilot) → catapultarsi

eject

(iˈdʒekt) verb
1. to throw out with force; to force to leave. They were ejected from their house for not paying the rent.
2. to leave an aircraft in an emergency by causing one's seat to be ejected. The pilot had to eject when his plane caught fire.
eˈjection (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
All thy request for Man, accepted Son, Obtain, all thy request was my Decree: But longer in that Paradise to dwell, The Law I gave to Nature him forbids: Those pure immortal Elements that know No gross, no unharmoneous mixture foule, Eject him tainted now, and purge him off As a distemper, gross to aire as gross, And mortal food, as may dispose him best For dissolution wrought by Sin, that first Distemperd all things, and of incorrupt Corrupted.
These serpents are not long, but have a body short and thick, and their bellies speckled with brown, black, and yellow; they have a wide mouth, with which they draw in a great quantity of air, and, having retained it some time, eject it with such force that they kill at four yards' distance.
de la Tremouille with a letter in which he begged of him to eject the cardinal's Guardsmen from his house, and to reprimand his people for their audacity in making SORTIE against the king's Musketeers.
A little music does occasionally stray in, but we are not musical in the law and soon eject it.
Trotty thought at first, that several had risen to eject the man; and hence this change in its appearance.
It could give a severe bite, and could eject water from its mouth to some distance, at the same time making a curious noise by the movement of its jaws.
In the hospitals, the students of medicine are requested, by notices upon the wall, to eject their tobacco juice into the boxes provided for that purpose, and not to discolour the stairs.
Behind a mountain of toothpicks he makes your change, files your check, and ejects at you, like a toad, a word about the weather.
These scraps of the wisdom of the captain's ancestors are received with such speechless indignation by Miss Abbey, that she instantly seizes the Captain by the collar, and without a single word ejects him, not presuming to remonstrate, from the scene.