elated


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e·lat·ed

 (ĭ-lā′tĭd)
adj.
Exultantly proud and joyful.

e·lat′ed·ly adv.
e·lat′ed·ness n.

elated

(ɪˈleɪtɪd)
adj
full of high spirits, exhilaration, pride or optimism; very happy
eˈlatedly adv
eˈlatedness n

e•lat•ed

(ɪˈleɪ tɪd)

adj.
jubilant; overjoyed.
[1605–15]
e•lat′ed•ly, adv.
e•lat′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.elated - exultantly proud and joyful; in high spirits; "the elated winner"; "felt elated and excited"
euphoric - exaggerated feeling of well-being or elation
happy - enjoying or showing or marked by joy or pleasure; "a happy smile"; "spent many happy days on the beach"; "a happy marriage"
joyous - full of or characterized by joy; "felt a joyous abandon"; "joyous laughter"
dejected - affected or marked by low spirits; "is dejected but trying to look cheerful"
2.elated - full of high-spirited delight; "a joyful heart"
joyous - full of or characterized by joy; "felt a joyous abandon"; "joyous laughter"

elated

elated

adjective
Feeling great delight and joy:
Slang: up.
Translations
مُنْتَشٍ من الفَرَح
begejstret
megmámorosodott
glaîur, í sjöunda himni
džiūgaujantisdžiūgavimaspakili nuotaikapakiliõs nuotaikos
coşkulusevinçli

elated

[ɪˈleɪtɪd] ADJ (= excited) → entusiasmado; (= happy) → eufórico, alborozado

elated

[ɪˈleɪtɪd] adjtransporté(e) de joie

elated

adjbegeistert

elated

[ɪˈleɪtɪd] adjesultante, euforico/a

elated

(iˈleitid) adjective
very cheerful. She felt elated after winning.
eˈlation noun
References in classic literature ?
Much elated with her success, Jo did `tell on', all about their plays and plans, their hopes and fears for Father, and the most interesting events of the little world in which the sisters lived.
She was satisfied with her success, but not elated.
Grose who first brought up the plumb with an almost elated "You see
Indeed, many are the Nantucket ships in which you will see the skipper parading his quarter-deck with an elated grandeur not surpassed in any military navy; nay, extorting almost as much outward homage as if he wore the imperial purple, and not the shabbiest of pilot-cloth.
Now, with elated step, they pace the planks in twos and threes, and humorously discourse of parlors, sofas, carpets, and fine cambrics; propose to mat the deck; think of having hangings to the top; object not to taking tea by moonlight on the piazza of the forecastle.
The day he arrived in Heidelberg he enrolled his name on the college books, and was so elated with the fact that his dearest hope had found fruition and he was actually a student of the old and renowned university, that he set to work that very night to celebrate the event by a grand lark in company with some other students.
I was greatly elated by these orders; but my heart smote me for my selfishness, when I witnessed their effect on Mr.
I liked this scheme, and Provis was quite elated by it.
The door opened, and a thick-set, heavy-looking young man entered, with the flushed face and the gratuitously elated bearing which mark the first stage of intoxication.
It was a matter of public knowledge, they said, that after the conquest of King William, his Norman followers, elated by so great a victory, acknowledged no law but their own wicked pleasure, and not only despoiled the conquered Saxons of their lands and their goods, but invaded the honour of their wives and of their daughters with the most unbridled license; and hence it was then common for matrons and maidens of noble families to assume the veil, and take shelter in convents, not as called thither by the vocation of God, but solely to preserve their honour from the unbridled wickedness of man.
I was greatly elated with my new command, and pleased with the bright, sunshiny weather and these different prospects of the coast.
The Christians who were to row were ready and in hiding in different places round about, all waiting for me, anxious and elated, and eager to attack the vessel they had before their eyes; for they did not know the renegade's plan, but expected that they were to gain their liberty by force of arms and by killing the Moors who were on board the vessel.