elderly


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eld·er·ly

 (ĕl′dər-lē)
adj.
1. Being past middle age and approaching old age; rather old.
2. Of, relating to, or characteristic of older persons or life in later years.
n.
1. pl. eld·er·lies An elderly person.
2. pl. elderly (used with a pl. verb) Older people considered as a group. Often used with the: special recreational programs for the elderly.

el′der·li·ness n.
Usage Note: Elderly applies to the stage of life well past middle age. When used as a noun in referring to older persons in general, it is relatively neutral, denoting a group of people whose common characteristic is advanced age: policy issues of special interest to the elderly. However, when used as an adjective in describing a particular person, elderly has a range of connotations that go beyond the denotation of chronological age. On the one hand it can suggest dignity, and its somewhat formal tone may express respect: sat next to an elderly gentleman at the concert. On the other hand it can imply frailty or diminished capacity, in which case it may sound condescending: was stuck in traffic behind an elderly driver. Regardless of other connotations, a phrase such as the elderly couple in the second row suggests greater age than if the couple were described as older. See Usage Note at senior.

elderly

(ˈɛldəlɪ)
(of people) adj
a. quite old; past middle age
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the elderly. geriatric
ˈelderliness n
Usage: Referring to any group using the formula the elderly, the disabled is nowadays felt to be inappropriate because it glosses over people's individuality and perpetuates stereotypes. It is preferable to use phrases such as disabled people and so forth. Many people also prefer to talk about older rather than elderly people for similar reasons

eld•er•ly

(ˈɛl dər li)

adj.
1. approaching old age.
2. of or pertaining to persons in later life.
n.
3. the elderly, elderly persons collectively.
[1605–15]
eld′er•li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elderly - people who are old collectivelyelderly - people who are old collectively; "special arrangements were available for the aged"
age bracket, age group, cohort - a group of people having approximately the same age
Adj.1.elderly - advanced in yearselderly - advanced in years; (`aged' is pronounced as two syllables); "aged members of the society"; "elderly residents could remember the construction of the first skyscraper"; "senior citizen"
old - (used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age; "his mother is very old"; "a ripe old age"; "how old are you?"

elderly

adjective
1. old, aged, ageing, ancient, mature, past it, venerable, patriarchal, grey-haired, geriatric (derogatory), getting on, over the hill (informal), grizzled, decrepit, hoary, superannuated, long in the tooth (informal), grey, doddery, senescent, advanced in years, full of years, past your prime There was an elderly couple on the terrace.
plural noun
1. old people, pensioners, senior citizens, geriatrics (derogatory), OAPs, retired people, old age pensioners, wrinklies (informal, derogatory) The elderly are a formidable force in any election.
Related words
adjective geriatric

elderly

adjective
Far along in life or time:
Idiom: getting along in years.
Translations
كَهْل، مُسِن، مُتَقَدِّم في السِّنمُسِنّ
postarší
ældre
iäkäs
stariji
roskinn, yfir miîjum aldri
年配の
나이가 지긋한
postarší
starejši ljudje
äldre
สูงวัย
yaşını başını almışyaşlıcayaşlılar
cao tuổi

elderly

[ˈeldəlɪ]
A. ADJmayor, de edad
an elderly gentlemanun señor mayor, un caballero de edad avanzada
an elderly manun anciano
to be getting elderlyir para viejo
B. NPL the elderlylas personas mayores, los ancianos

elderly

[ˈɛldərli]
adjâgé(e)
npl
the elderly → les personnes fpl âgéeselder statesman nvétéran m de la politique

elderly

adjältlich, ältere(r, s) attr

elderly

[ˈɛldəlɪ]
1. adjanziano/a
2. npl the elderlygli anziani

elder1

(ˈeldə) adjective
(often of members of a family) older; senior. He has three elder sisters; He is the elder of the two.
noun
1. a person who is older. Take the advice of your elders.
2. an office-bearer in Presbyterian churches.
ˈelderly adjective
(rather) old. an elderly lady.
ˈeldest adjective
oldest. She is the eldest of the three children.
the elderly
people who are (rather) old. It is important for the elderly to take some exercise.

elderly

مُسِنّ postarší ældre ältlich ηλικιωμένος anciano iäkäs âgé stariji anziano 年配の 나이가 지긋한 bejaard tilårskommen starszy idoso пожилой äldre สูงวัย yaşlılar cao tuổi 年过中年的

elderly

adv. de avanzada edad.

elderly

adj de edad avanzada, mayor
References in classic literature ?
Carrol, as Amy sat down beside her with the confiding air elderly people like so well in the young.
The elderly chief made a gesture of commendation, which was answered by most of his companions, who each threw forth a hand and uttered a brief exclamation of pleasure.
Is all this precious time to be lavished on the matutinal repair and beautifying of an elderly person, who never goes abroad, whom nobody ever visits, and from whom, when she shall have done her utmost, it were the best charity to turn one's eyes another way?
Such occasions might remind the elderly citizen of that period, before the last war with England, when Salem was a port by itself; not scorned, as she is now, by her own merchants and ship-owners, who permit her wharves to crumble to ruin while their ventures go to swell, needlessly and imperceptibly, the mighty flood of commerce at New York or Boston.
There was nothing so very particular, perhaps, about the appearance of the elderly man I saw; he was brown and brawny, like most old seamen, and heavily rolled up in blue pilot-cloth, cut in the Quaker style; only there was a fine and almost microscopic net-work of the minutest wrinkles interlacing round his eyes, which must have arisen from his continual sailings in many hard gales, and always looking to windward; --for this causes the muscles about the eyes to become pursed together.
About a block away from them there lived another Lithuanian family, consisting of an elderly widow and one grown son; their name was Majauszkis, and our friends struck up an acquaintance with them before long.
In the pew directly in front of us sat an elderly lady, plainly and cheaply dressed; at her side sat a young lady with a very sweet face, and she also was quite simply dressed; but around us and about us were clothes and jewels which it would do anybody's heart good to worship in.
The teacher, a grave, elderly man, interfered; then turned his back a moment and Tom pulled a boy's hair in the next bench, and was absorbed in his book when the boy turned around; stuck a pin in another boy, presently, in order to hear him say "Ouch
The remembrance of Rebecca was so vivid that their sister Aurelia's letter was something of a shock to the quiet, elderly spinsters of the brick house; for it said that Hannah could not possibly be spared for a few years yet, but that Rebecca would come as soon as she could be made ready; that the offer was most thankfully appreciated, and that the regular schooling and church privileges, as well as the influence of the Sawyer home, would doubtless be "the making of Rebecca"
She must know as well as her father, how acceptable an instrument would be; and perhaps the mode of it, the mystery, the surprize, is more like a young woman's scheme than an elderly man's.
Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.
I looked in vain for her I had first seen the night before; she was not visible: Miss Miller occupied the foot of the table where I sat, and a strange, foreign-looking, elderly lady, the French teacher, as I afterwards found, took the corresponding seat at the other board.