election

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e·lec·tion

 (ĭ-lĕk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of electing someone to fill an office or position: Officers are chosen by election and not by appointment.
b. An instance of this: Did you vote in this election?
c. The fact of being elected: her election to the Senate.
2. An act of choosing; a selection: your election of benefits.
3. Predestined salvation, especially as conceived by Calvinists.

election

(ɪˈlɛkʃən)
n
1. (Parliamentary Procedure) the selection by vote of a person or persons from among candidates for a position, esp a political office
2. a public vote on an official proposition
3. the act or an instance of choosing
4. (Protestantism) Christianity
a. the doctrine of Calvin that God chooses certain individuals for salvation without reference to their faith or works
b. the doctrine of Arminius and others that God chooses for salvation those who, by grace, persevere in faith and works

e•lec•tion

(ɪˈlɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the selection by vote of a candidate for office.
2. a public vote upon candidates, etc., submitted.
3. the choice by God of individuals, as for salvation.
[1225–75; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]

election

the theological doctrine of God’s predestination of individuals as objects of divine mercy and salvation.
See also: Christianity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.election - a vote to select the winner of a position or political officeelection - a vote to select the winner of a position or political office; "the results of the election will be announced tonight"
reelection - election again; "he did not run for reelection"
vote - the opinion of a group as determined by voting; "they put the question to a vote"
general election - a national or state election; candidates are chosen in all constituencies
primary, primary election - a preliminary election where delegates or nominees are chosen
bye-election, by-election - a special election between regular elections
runoff - a final election to resolve an earlier election that did not produce a winner
poll - the counting of votes (as in an election)
absentee ballot - (election) a ballot that is cast while absent (usually mailed in prior to election day)
contestee - a winner (of a race or an election etc.) whose victory is contested
contester - someone who contests an outcome (of a race or an election etc.)
public servant - someone who holds a government position (either by election or appointment)
absolute majority, majority - (elections) more than half of the votes
relative majority, plurality - (in an election with more than 2 options) the number of votes for the candidate or party receiving the greatest number (but less that half of the votes)
2.election - the act of selecting someone or something; the exercise of deliberate choice; "her election of medicine as a profession"
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
co-optation, co-option - the selection of a new member (usually by a vote of the existing membership)
cumulative vote - an election in which each person has as many votes as there are positions to be filled and they can all be cast for one candidate or can be distributed in any manner
3.election - the status or fact of being elected; "they celebrated his election"
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
4.election - the predestination of some individuals as objects of divine mercy (especially as conceived by Calvinists)
foreordination, predetermination, preordination, predestination - (theology) being determined in advance; especially the doctrine (usually associated with Calvin) that God has foreordained every event throughout eternity (including the final salvation of mankind)

election

noun
1. vote, poll, ballot, determination, referendum, franchise, plebiscite, show of hands Poland's first fully free elections for more than fifty years
2. appointment, choosing, picking, choice, selection the election of the Labour government in 1964
Quotations
"Elections are won by men and women chiefly because most people vote against somebody rather than for somebody" [Franklin P. Adams Nods and Becks]

election

noun
The act of choosing:
Translations
أنْتِخابانتخاباِنْتِخَاب
volby
valg
elekto
vaalit
izbori
választás
kosningar
選挙
선거
volitve
val
การเลือกตั้ง
sự bầu cử

election

[ɪˈlɛkʃən]
n
(= event) → élection f
to hold an election → procéder à une élection
[person, government] → élection f
election as sth → élection comme qch, élection au poste de qch
modif [broadcast, date, day, year, winner] → des élections; [manifesto, promise, pledge, platform, defeat, result] → électoral(e); [candidate] → aux électionselection campaign ncampagne f électorale

election

nWahl f; his election to the chairmanshipseine Wahl zum Vorsitzenden; election debacleWahldebakel nt

election

in cpdsWahl-; election victory/defeatWahlsieg m/-niederlage f;
election campaign
nWahlkampf m

election

[ɪˈlɛkʃn] nelezione f; (of Government) → elezioni fpl
to hold an election → indire un'elezione
the election will be held next week → l'elezione avrà luogo la settimana prossima

elect

(iˈlekt) verb
1. to choose by vote. He was elected chairman; elected to the committee.
2. to choose (to do something). They elected to go by taxi.
adjective
(placed immediately after noun) chosen for office but not yet in it. the president elect.
eˈlection (-ʃən) noun
the choosing, or choice, (usually by vote) of person(s) for office. When do the elections take place?; He is standing for election again.
eˌlectioˈneer (-ʃə-) verb
to work to bring about the election of a candidate.
eˈlector noun
a person who has the right to vote at an election. Not all the electors bothered to vote.
eˈlectoral adjective
of elections or electors. The names of all electors are listed in the electoral roll.
eˈlectorate (-rət) noun
all electors taken together. Half of the electorate did not vote.

election

اِنْتِخَاب volby valg Wahl εκλογές elección vaalit élection izbori elezione 選挙 선거 verkiezing valg wybory eleição выборы val การเลือกตั้ง seçim sự bầu cử 选举
References in classic literature ?
In the stockyards this was only in national and state elections, for in local elections the Democratic Party always carried everything.
Well, now, but I'm not sure, after all, about this religion," said he, the old wicked expression returning to his eye; "the country is almost ruined with pious white people; such pious politicians as we have just before elections,--such pious goings on in all departments of church and state, that a fellow does not know who'll cheat him next.
Neither could I be wholly unmoved, after comparing the living with the dead, when I considered how all these pure native virtues were prostituted for a piece of money by their grand-children; who, in selling their votes and managing at elections, have acquired every vice and corruption that can possibly be learned in a court.
Is it probable that it would be persevered in, and transmitted along through all the successive variations in a representative body, which biennial elections would naturally produce in both houses?
In the next place, as each representative will be chosen by a greater number of citizens in the large than in the small republic, it will be more difficult for unworthy candidates to practice with success the vicious arts by which elections are too often carried; and the suffrages of the people being more free, will be more likely to centre in men who possess the most attractive merit and the most diffusive and established characters.
He now returned to his old opinions, and became the leader of the liberal party in Alencon, the invisible manipulator of elections, and did immense harm to the Restoration by the cleverness of his underhand proceedings and the perfidy of his outward behavior.
private secretary to a minister, plunged at once into European cabals and Parisian intrigues; having kings, and, better still, queens, to protect, parties to unite, elections to direct; making more use of your cabinet with your pen and your telegraph than Napoleon did of his battle-fields with his sword and his victories; possessing five and twenty thousand francs a year, besides your place; a horse, for which Chateau-Renaud offered you four hundred louis, and which you would not part with; a tailor who never disappoints you; with the opera, the jockey-club, and other diversions, can you not amuse yourself?
The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.
If you had done with Cuffy what you ought to have done when he first came into Parliament, and had prevented him from going over to Duffy, you would have got him into alliance with Fuffy, you would have had with you the weight attaching as a smart debater to Guffy, you would have brought to bear upon the elections the wealth of Huffy, you would have got in for three counties Juffy, Kuffy, and Luffy, and you would have strengthened your administration by the official knowledge and the business habits of Muffy.
By this means he says he shall necessarily have an equal number of each rank, but he is mistaken--for the majority will always consist of those of the first rank, and the most considerable people; and for this reason, that many of the commonalty not being obliged to it, will not attend the elections.
But to use a more modest illustration and nearer home, I observe that in our political elections, where this element, if it appears at all, can only occur in its coarsest form, we sufficiently understand its incomparable rate.
He was something of a politician, and had always taken a prominent part in the local elections, so he knew the proper Parliamentary expressions to use.