elegance


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el·e·gance

 (ĕl′ĭ-gəns)
n.
1.
a. Refinement, grace, and beauty in movement, appearance, or manners.
b. Tasteful opulence in form, decoration, or presentation.
2.
a. Restraint and grace of style.
b. Scientific exactness and precision.
3. Something elegant.

elegance

(ˈɛlɪɡəns) or

elegancy

n, pl -gances or -gancies
1. dignified grace in appearance, movement, or behaviour
2. good taste in design, style, arrangement, etc
3. something elegant; a refinement

el•e•gance

(ˈɛl ɪ gəns)

n.
1. elegant quality.
2. something elegant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elegance - a refined quality of gracefulness and good tasteelegance - a refined quality of gracefulness and good taste; "she conveys an aura of elegance and gentility"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
dash, panache, elan, flair, style - distinctive and stylish elegance; "he wooed her with the confident dash of a cavalry officer"
daintiness, delicacy, fineness - the quality of being beautiful and delicate in appearance; "the daintiness of her touch"; "the fineness of her features"
courtliness - elegance suggestive of a royal court
tastefulness - elegance indicated by good taste
breeding, genteelness, gentility - elegance by virtue of fineness of manner and expression
chic, chicness, modishness, stylishness, swank, chichi, last word, smartness - elegance by virtue of being fashionable
grandeur, magnificence, splendor, splendour, brilliance, grandness - the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand; "for magnificence and personal service there is the Queen's hotel"; "his `Hamlet' lacks the brilliance that one expects"; "it is the university that gives the scene its stately splendor"; "an imaginative mix of old-fashioned grandeur and colorful art"; "advertisers capitalize on the grandness and elegance it brings to their products"
eclat, pomp - ceremonial elegance and splendor; "entered with much eclat in a coach drawn by eight white horses"
class - elegance in dress or behavior; "she has a lot of class"
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
2.elegance - a quality of neatness and ingenious simplicity in the solution of a problem (especially in science or mathematics); "the simplicity and elegance of his invention"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare

elegance

noun style, taste, beauty, grace, dignity, sophistication, grandeur, refinement, polish, gentility, sumptuousness, courtliness, gracefulness, tastefulness, exquisiteness Princess Grace's understated elegance
Quotations
"To me, elegance is not to pass unnoticed but to get to the very soul of what one is" [Christian Lacroix]

elegance

noun
Refined, effortless beauty of manner, form, and style:
Translations
إتْقان، أناقَه
elegance
elegancestilfuldhed
elegancia
glæsileiki
şıklıkzerafet

elegance

[ˈelɪgəns] Nelegancia f

elegance

[ˈɛlɪgəns] n
(= stylishness) [street, furniture, house] → élégance f; [person] → élégance f
(= cleverness) [style, writing] → élégance f; [idea, solution] → élégance f

elegance

nEleganz f

elegance

[ˈɛlɪgəns] neleganza

elegant

(ˈeligənt) adjective
having or showing stylishness. elegant clothes; You look elegant today.
ˈelegance noun
References in classic literature ?
Dashwood was upon the whole well satisfied; for though her former style of life rendered many additions to the latter indispensable, yet to add and improve was a delight to her; and she had at this time ready money enough to supply all that was wanted of greater elegance to the apartments.
It was a style of beauty, of which elegance was the reigning character, and as such, she must, in honour, by all her principles, admire it:elegance, which, whether of person or of mind, she saw so little in Highbury.
The elegance, propriety, regularity, harmony, and perhaps, above all, the peace and tranquillity of Mansfield, were brought to her remembrance every hour of the day, by the prevalence of everything opposite to them here.
The house is a good one, the furniture fashionable, and everything announces plenty and elegance.
Mary had acquired a little artificial importance, by becoming Mrs Charles Musgrove; but Anne, with an elegance of mind and sweetness of character, which must have placed her high with any people of real understanding, was nobody with either father or sister; her word had no weight, her convenience was always to give way-- she was only Anne.
was all that Catherine had to say, for her indiscriminating eye scarcely discerned the colour of the satin; and all minuteness of praise, all praise that had much meaning, was supplied by the general: the costliness or elegance of any room's fitting-up could be nothing to her; she cared for no furniture of a more modern date than the fifteenth century.
The old face, calm and pleasant as ever; the complexion, quite juvenile in its bloom and clearness; the same smile; the wonted precision and elegance of dress; the white, well-ordered teeth; the delicate hands; the composed and quiet manner; everything as it used to be: no mark of age or passion, envy, hate, or discontent: all unruffled and serene, and quite delightful to behold.
He also drew up his laws with greater elegance and accuracy than even any of our present legislators.
I cannot admit it," said Sergey Ivanovitch, with his habitual clearness, precision of expression, and elegance of phrase.
The writers of the reigns of Anne and George I called their period the Augustan Age, because they flattered themselves that with them English life and literature had reached a culminating period of civilization and elegance corresponding to that which existed at Rome under the Emperor Augustus.
Maggie perceived that Pete brought forth all his elegance and all his knowledge of high-class customs for her benefit.
But to make this the sole consideration of marriage, to lust after it so violently as to overlook all imperfections for its sake, or to require it so absolutely as to reject and disdain religion, virtue, and sense, which are qualities in their nature of much higher perfection, only because an elegance of person is wanting: this is surely inconsistent, either with a wise man or a good Christian.