elegiac


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Related to elegiac: elegiac couplet

el·e·gi·ac

 (ĕl′ə-jī′ək, ĭ-lē′jē-ăk′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or involving elegy or mourning or expressing sorrow for that which is irrecoverably past: an elegiac lament for youthful ideals.
2. Of or composed in elegiac couplets.

[Late Latin elegīacus, from Greek elegeiakos, from elegeia, elegy; see elegy.]

el′e·gi′ac n.
el′e·gi′a·cal adj.
el′e·gi′a·cal·ly adv.

elegiac

(ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. lamenting; mournful; plaintive
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas. Also (archaic): elegiacal
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often plural) an elegiac couplet or stanza
ˌeleˈgiacally adv

el•e•gi•ac

(ˌɛl ɪˈdʒaɪ ək, -æk, ɪˈli dʒiˌæk)

adj. Also, el`e•gi′a•cal.
1. used in, suitable for, or resembling an elegy.
2. expressing sorrow; mournful.
3. (in classical prosody) noting a distich, the first line of which is a dactylic hexameter and the second a pentameter.
n.
4. an elegiac verse.
5. poetry in such verses.
[1575–85; (< Middle French) < Latin < Greek]

elegiac

- Can mean "melancholy, mournful."
See also related terms for melancholy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.elegiac - resembling or characteristic of or appropriate to an elegy; "an elegiac poem on a friend's death"
2.elegiac - expressing sorrow often for something past; "an elegiac lament for youthful ideals"
sorrowful - experiencing or marked by or expressing sorrow especially that associated with irreparable loss; "sorrowful widows"; "a sorrowful tale of death and despair"; "sorrowful news"; "even in laughter the heart is sorrowful"- Proverbs 14:13

elegiac

adjective (Literary) lamenting, sad, melancholy, nostalgic, mournful, plaintive, melancholic, sorrowful, funereal, valedictory, keening, dirgeful, threnodial, threnodic The music has a dreamy, elegiac quality.
Translations

elegiac

[ˌelɪˈdʒaɪək] ADJelegíaco

elegiac

[ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək] adj (literary) [quality, mood] → élégiaque

elegiac

adjelegisch
n usu pl (Liter) → elegischer Vers, Vers mim elegischen Versmaß

elegiac

[ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək] adj (liter) → elegiaco/a
References in classic literature ?
People do, indeed, add the word 'maker' or 'poet' to the name of the metre, and speak of elegiac poets, or epic (that is, hexameter) poets, as if it were not the imitation that makes the poet, but the verse that entitles them all indiscriminately to the name.
I had always admired the genius of Glaucon and Adeimantus, but on hearing these words I was quite delighted, and said: Sons of an illustrious father, that was not a bad beginning of the Elegiac verses which the admirer of Glaucon made in honour of you after you had distinguished yourselves at the battle of Megara:--
He still talked vaguely of the things he was going to do in the future, but with less conviction; and he was conscious that his friends no longer believed in him: when he had drank two or three glasses of whiskey he was inclined to be elegiac.
The poetry of the sun has something of the epic in it; that of fog and mist is elegiac and religious.
Spare us your elegiac tones," said the Parrot giggling.
Indeed, he bore some grudge against the family and friends of Ardshiel, and before he was drunk he read me a lampoon, in very good Latin, but with a very ill meaning, which he had made in elegiac verses upon a person of that house.
There remain also a few pagan lyric poems, which are all not only somber like 'Beowulf' but distinctly elegiac, that is pensively melancholy.
He then proceeded to patch his tags together with the help of his Gradus, producing an incongruous and feeble result of eight elegiac lines, the minimum quantity for his form, and finishing up with two highly moral lines extra, making ten in all, which he cribbed entire from one of his books, beginning "O genus humanum," and which he himself must have used a dozen times before, whenever an unfortunate or wicked hero, of whatever nation or language under the sun, was the subject.
Avienus, also a contemporary of Ausonius, put some of these fables into Latin elegiacs, which are given by Nevelet (in a book we shall refer to hereafter), and are occasionally incorporated with the editions of Phaedrus.
The author of the book is famous novelist, elegiac poem writer and poet Parveen Haider, said a statement issued here.
German guest conductor Christoph Poppen will lead the orchestra in the Fourth Symphony in E minor, the composer's last elegiac symphony.
It's a great opportunity to catch works by British choreographer David Dawson, whose fluid, hyperphysical movement vocabulary turns elegiac in On the Nature of Daylight (score by Max Richter) and delightfully virtuosic in 5 (excerpted from his Giselle).