elegiac

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el·e·gi·ac

 (ĕl′ə-jī′ək, ĭ-lē′jē-ăk′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or involving elegy or mourning or expressing sorrow for that which is irrecoverably past: an elegiac lament for youthful ideals.
2. Of or composed in elegiac couplets.

[Late Latin elegīacus, from Greek elegeiakos, from elegeia, elegy; see elegy.]

el′e·gi′ac n.
el′e·gi′a·cal adj.
el′e·gi′a·cal·ly adv.

elegiac

(ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) resembling, characteristic of, relating to, or appropriate to an elegy
2. lamenting; mournful; plaintive
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) denoting or written in elegiac couplets or elegiac stanzas. Also (archaic): elegiacal
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (often plural) an elegiac couplet or stanza
ˌeleˈgiacally adv

el•e•gi•ac

(ˌɛl ɪˈdʒaɪ ək, -æk, ɪˈli dʒiˌæk)

adj. Also, el`e•gi′a•cal.
1. used in, suitable for, or resembling an elegy.
2. expressing sorrow; mournful.
3. (in classical prosody) noting a distich, the first line of which is a dactylic hexameter and the second a pentameter.
n.
4. an elegiac verse.
5. poetry in such verses.
[1575–85; (< Middle French) < Latin < Greek]

elegiac

- Can mean "melancholy, mournful."
See also related terms for melancholy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.elegiac - resembling or characteristic of or appropriate to an elegy; "an elegiac poem on a friend's death"
2.elegiac - expressing sorrow often for something past; "an elegiac lament for youthful ideals"
sorrowful - experiencing or marked by or expressing sorrow especially that associated with irreparable loss; "sorrowful widows"; "a sorrowful tale of death and despair"; "sorrowful news"; "even in laughter the heart is sorrowful"- Proverbs 14:13

elegiac

adjective (Literary) lamenting, sad, melancholy, nostalgic, mournful, plaintive, melancholic, sorrowful, funereal, valedictory, keening, dirgeful, threnodial, threnodic The music has a dreamy, elegiac quality.
Translations

elegiac

[ˌelɪˈdʒaɪək] ADJelegíaco

elegiac

[ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək] adj (literary) [quality, mood] → élégiaque

elegiac

adjelegisch
n usu pl (Liter) → elegischer Vers, Vers mim elegischen Versmaß

elegiac

[ˌɛlɪˈdʒaɪək] adj (liter) → elegiaco/a
References in periodicals archive ?
You may ignore them, or you may wish elegiacally that ours was a society that did not grant such creeps prominence, or you may even moralize and thunder that no self-respecting citizen should buy the damn book.
In the wonderful paradox that poetry makes possible, the silence of the ocean grave speaks through the poet, and elegiacally lays the dead sailors asleep.
As we read this part of the Canto, though, it's almost as if Pound has noted that chapter, but that he has simply internalised it as a prelude to the more elegiacally inflected lines that follow.
that revolved around a transcendental center now lost and elegiacally celebrated.
The American Ray Bradbury, "science-fiction's Poet Laureate", wrote elegiacally of a planet whose peoples had disappeared long, long ago (maybe coming here?
Cixous's voyage into the ice breaks us open and warmly holds us as we travel its dream route in the bright proximity to death that here is somehow both elegiacally and immediately alive.
Revelation by the imagination is rooted in this ambiguous human reality; Virgil's evocations of glory, accordingly, are intoned elegiacally and with painful cognizance of their ultimate impotence and vanity vis-a-vis death.
In the final section of Capps's poem, bodies dissolve and bodies are elegiacally restored.
During an interval discussion, Webern was frequently referred to, but it was Berg's Violin Concerto which came to mind during a work which ruminates elegiacally, which gleams with sought-after sunshine, which is so expertly, sensitively scored, and in which passages remain in the memory.
Inspired by the Englishman Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" (1751), Millevoye created the prototypical image of the doomed jeune malade, the young invalid who, "triste, et mourant a son aurore" ("sad, and dying in the dawn of his years"), wanders elegiacally amid an autumnal wood in his 1811 poem "La Chute des Feuilles" ("The Falling of the Leaves"; Millevoye 79X5 Raging against his own mortality, longing for the beloved he cannot now marry, and melancholically contemplating the transience of life, Millevoye's jeune malade is Faust, Werther, and Hamlet by turns.
Parreno's unnervingly blank, glowing marquees seem to elegiacally acknowledge the likely demise of the movie theater, one of the chief sites where the subjects of industrial modernity were able to leave the here and now behind--where spectators could sit down in the dark, fix their eyes on a monumental screen, and find themselves transported almost anywhere, anywhere out of the world.
Whereas Allemagne 90 elegiacally registered the demise of "really existing socialism," Pavsek, basing his argument on the Badiou lecture on Husserlian geometry briefly shown in Film socialisme, argues that the later film "calls for a return to 'socialism as origin'" (71).